FREEBIE & HACK Baby Sock Hat

Koigu KPPPM Baby Hat Blue 1

Koigu KPPPM Baby Hat Pink 1

Easy Peasy Newborn Sock Hat

I whipped up these adorable little baby hats last week, they’re definitely very easy and kind of addictive! Of course, it doesn’t hurt that the yarn (Koigu KPPPM) is gorgeous and extremely visually satisfying. I’ve made two and I’ll cast on another tonight at SNB (I’ve got a display idea rolling around in my head and a good friend with a brand new baby).

Yarn Options

Any kind of sock weight yarn will work for this project, as long as it is soft and machine washable – it’s for a baby, after all. We made our samples with Koigu KPPPM, which are perfect in their little 50g skeins, or a couple of mini skeins of Madeline Tosh Unicorn Tails. A Sweet Georgia Party of Five or Wollmeside Taste of Wollmeise kit would make some adorable ombre baby hats!

Materials

  • FREE Pattern
  • About 25g of sock weight (fingering) yarn (see above)
  • 3mm/US2.5 – 16″ circular needles
  • 3mm/US2.5 double pointed needles
  • tapestry or darning needle
  • stitch markers (optional but very useful for decreases)

 

Koigu KPPPM Baby Hat Blocking

Knit Hack: Blocking

In knitting, it ain’t over until your project is blocked. I like to wet block, which means washing your project in a no-rinse delicate wash and laying it flat to dry. Wet blocking allows the fibres in your textile to relax and take their final shape.

In the photo above, the blue hat (above) has not been blocked, and the hat below (I have no idea who to describe the colour) has been washed.

BEFORE: Before blocking the textile was firmer, it had more body and memory, the hat held it’s shape, it was able to stand up without support, and the fit was smaller. Measurements: 6.75” wide at bottom (right above brim), 5” high

AFTER: After blocking the textile became floppier, softer, but less crisp. It was no longer able to stand up without a support, and the fit was larger. Measurements: 7” wide, 6” high.

There are, of course, other ways to block a garment, but I like wet blocking because it’s honest, it gives you the most information. Your garment is most likely going to be washed at some point in its life, especially if it is a for a baby. It also settles the stitches into their final place, smoothing things out. If your wet textile is looking a little bit droopy after wet blocking you can try steaming it to add a little bit of body and plump up the fibres. A hand steamer is great, but if you are using a steam iron do not press on your textile, just hold it over and let the steam do its job.

And by the way, when you are knitting a gauge swatch to check your tension, you won’t get a truly accurate number until after your textile is blocked. Generally, it is best to block in the same manner you are also going to launder your finished garment.

Koigu KPPPM Baby Hat COMBO BLOG.jpg