Category Archives: SUMMER

FINISHED Cruz Bay Crochet Cardi

Cruz Bay

I finished my Cruz Bay crochet cardi! It turned out really nicely, it’s a great summer top, I’m very happy with it and wearing it in the store.

The Pattern

It wasn’t a crazy hard piece, but I’d say it was an advanced beginner to intermediate level of crochet pattern. I used a larger hook because my tension was looking too tight in the pattern stitch (luckily you start the pattern from the bottom of the sleeve so it sort of serves as an opportunity to check your tension). I had a few pattern questions that needed clarification and the designer, Donna Yacino, was incredibly fast and helpful. I put my modifications& details in my Ravelry Notes. Keep reading for more details from my project experience.

The Yarn

Berroco Estiva is a soft, machine washable 100% cotton, made in Italy. It works up in a gradient, from light to dark (or vice versa). It was easy to crochet with and worked up reasonably fast (for a tape yarn). I used 2.5 cakes of yarn for the smallest size. Each sleeve/side used its own cake of yarn. I started from the dark end of the cake and worked to the light. I used the remnants from the sleeves/sides to start work on the medallions around the neck and then started my third cake at the light end.

FYI: Berroco Estiva is 20% OFF until July 31st!

Size

The fit for this cardi is oversized and unstructured.

  • Bust (closed): 36 (40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, 64)“
  • Length: 13 (13, 14, 14, 15, 15, 16, 16)” including lower edging
  • Shown in size 36 this blog post (my finished size ended up: 40″ body circumference, 12″ sleeve cuff circumference, 16″ upper sleeve circumference. My tension was 3 stitch pattern repeats & 14 rows = 4″/10cm)

Materials

Notes

I didn’t always find the pattern instructions incredibly, explicitly clear … I don’t know if it was my limited experience with crochet sweater patterns or because the pattern was written during COVID and the designer and editors were totally stressed – either way Berroco and Donna Yacino were both great.

The instructions for the rows on the body were a bit vague and I kind of fudged it (crochet is more flexible than knitting, you can do this … and after previously emailing Donna twice I decided she had earned a break) except I didn’t really keep track of what I did on the first side … and then COVID brain kicked in. As you can see in the picture above, it’s a good idea to write down what you did. I didn’t. Ooops. My general approach to this project was “Does it look like the picture? Good enough!” I am very appreciative to Apple for making it possible for me to embiggen images on my iPad.

FYI: If you decide to make this pattern with another yarn I strongly suggest you swatch first.

Ron’s Patterns Review

My beau, Ron, is sitting next to me while I write this blog post and he doesn’t understand why I have so much to discuss. His review: “I sat next to her and she didn’t swear at all during it, so I’m guessing it’d be good for an advanced beginner or low level intermediate.” Sage words.

SUMMER SALE!

Our Summer Sale is ON! Select summery yarns) are 20% Off all July.

Can’t make it in? No Problem! It’s all in our Online Store, which offers a Free In-Store Pick-Up option at check out. Can’t make it in at all? That’s ok too, you can have your order shipped – plus Orders over $150 ship forFREE!

PROJECT Keane Wonder

Kelbourne Woolens, Mojave Collection

Keane Wonder

Keane Wonder is a funky summer tank with a sporty racerback, worked in pieces from the bottom up. Short rows shape the hem, and a-line decreases shape the sides of the tank. The colour is fab, and the details are interesting and flattering (if you aren’t sure about the stripe situation feel free to skip over any elements you want).

The Pattern

When shaping the racerback, you will be working increases and decreases on both right side and wrong side rows. Pay attention to the stitch pattern and maintain the pattern as set when working the increases, working purl increases or decreases when necessary. The increases and decreases on the back neck shaping occur simultaneously, but the instructions are written separately due to the differing rate of increases and decreases on each size. Make sure you read through the entire back neck shaping and work both components of the shaping simultaneously.

  • Kelbourne has also included free tutorials for some techniques that newer knitters might be less familiar with (see links below).
  • You can see the rest of the patterns from the Mojave Collection HERE.

The Yarn

Kelbourne Mojave is a super soft and light blend of cotton & linen. It comes in some really beautiful muted colours and also some awesomely bright colours – I’m especially fond of Seafoam Green and Flamingo Pink (it’s really peach). The more neutral colours tend to be nuanced, the type of colour that’s constantly changing based on the light.

Kelbourne Woolens, Mojave Collection

Size

  • 34 (38, 42, 46, 50, 54, 58)” [86.5 (96.5, 106.5, 117, 127, 137, 147.5) cm] bust
  • Sweater is designed to be worn with 2” (5 cm) of positive ease. Please see schematic for more detailed finished measurements

Materials

  • Kelbourne Mojave: 3 (4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7) skeins, shown in 737 bright yellow
  • 3.25mm/US3 – 16” (40 cm) circular needles
  • 3.25mm/US3 – 29” (80 cm) circular needles
  • 3.5mm/US – 29” (80 cm) circular needles
  • darning needle
  • Pattern
Kelbourne Woolens, Mojave Collection

Tutorials

Short row shaping, visit Kelbourne’s Tips and Tricks here.
• Mattress stitch, visit Kelbourne’s Tips and Tricks here.
• Evenly picking up stitches, visit Kelbourne’s Tips and Tricks here.
• Three Needle Bind-Off, visit Kelbourne’s Tips and Tricks here.

Kelbourne Woolens, Mojave Collection

PROJECT Two Crochet Bags with Estiva

Both of these Bags are made with Berroco Estiva, a super soft, 100% cotton tape yarn that’s perfect for Spring & Summer knits and crochets. It’s comfortable, easy to knit with, and it comes in gorgeous gradient colours that fade from light to dark. It’s bulky weight yarn so it works up fast!

Saba Island

This crochet bag is substantial! Seriously, it looks big enough to carry EVERYTHING. Measuring in at 58″ around top edge and 19″ deep (not including straps) the only thing that won’t fit inside is the kitchen sink. It’s a dense crochet, so it’s going to be sturdy … nothing’s falling out the bottom of this baby.

Materials


Magra

I really like this pattern … the medallions in the upper third are really pretty, they’re a very crochet aesthetic. But I also like the stitch pattern that’s been used for the middle part of the bag. It creates a really subtle feature that adds extra interest and visually breaks up the bag. Many crochet bags are designed in the single crochet stitch because it is dense and sturdy, but it’s also a bit bland. I’m going to give this one a try and see how the stitch turns out, maybe I’ll be able to add something to my repertoire!

Materials


PROJECT Nettle

Nettle

Nettle is a pretty, lacy triangular wrap made with Quince & Co Sparrow linen. It’s light and drapey and makes a great accent with summer clothes. The pattern is from a cool book of shawls that came out last fall, To The Point: The Knitted Triangle. If you like triangular wraps you should definitely give it a look. Even if you don’t, it makes for some good eye-candy.

Materials


PROJECT Seguin

Seguin

Straight off, let’s acknowledge that Seguin is not a design for the chestier ladies. I think it’s important to value all bodies, and some of those bodies look really pretty with a bit of an accent in front. I also like the ‘smocking detail’ (it isn’t really smocking), it’s just interesting and a cool texture. I don’t think it would be hard to omit the ruffle and just keep the slipped stitch cable rib. Seguin is made with Quince & Co Sparrow, but if you like the aesthetic but want a thicker yarn that knits faster try Merrifield, made with Quince & Co Kestrel and 6.5mm/US10.5 needles … isn’t that nice of them?

Size

  • Finished Bust: 32½ (36¼, 40, 43¾, 47½, 51½, 55¼, 59, 62¾)” [82.5 (92, 101.5, 111, 120.5, 131, 140.5, 150, 159.5) cm]
  • Shown in size 36¼” / 92 cm on a 34” / 86.5 cm, 5’5” / 165 cm tall model (2 1⁄4” / 6 cm positive ease)

Materials

  • Quince & Co Sparrow: 6 (6, 7, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10, 11) skeins
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 16″ circular needles
  • 4mm/US6 – 24″ circular needles
  • 4mm/US6 – 32″ circular needles
  • Pattern

PROJECT Cruz Bay Crochet Cardie

Cruz Bay

I’ve been looking forward to this pattern since my sales rep visited last winter … I even bought extra yarn in my first order hoping I’d be able to get my greedy little hands on the pattern early. That didn’t end up happening, but that’s ok, better late than never! It’s a casual crochet cardie made with Berroco’s lurvly summer yarn Estiva. Estiva is a really versatile yarn; it’s a soft cotton tape, easy to work with, machine washable, and made in Italy. The colours range from muted to bright, so you’ve got lots of options.I don’t personally look great in yellow, but I can’t get my head around this sweater in it, it’s just so perfect! I was going to make it in the teal, but now I don’t know …

Size

  • Finished Bust (closed):  36 (40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, 64)”
  • Length:  13 (13, 14, 14, 15, 15, 16, 16)” including lower edgingShown in size 44″. 
  • Recommended ease:  2–4″ positive ease.

Materials

  • Berroco Estiva: 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5) cakes (2612 Curry)
  • 5.5mm/USI crochet hook
  • 1 removable stitch marker
  • Pattern

PROJECT Laudholm

Laudholm

Something classic and cool for summer makes me very happy. It’s knit with Quince & Co Sparrow, one of my favourite yarns for summer. It feels soft and cool on your skin, washes beautifully in the machine, and just kind of *flows*.

Note: Linen can be quite stretchy once it is washed, so be sure to swatch a square at least 5″ x 5″ and wash it before you measure your tension. You may also want to make a smaller size than normal, I usually go down one size.

Size

  • Finished Bust: 34 ¾ (37 ¾ , 40 ¾ , 43 3⁄4, 46 ¾ , 50, 53, 56, 59, 62)” [88.5 (96, 103.5, 111, 118.5, 127, 134.5, 142, 150, 157.5) cm]
  • Shown in size 37 ¾ ” [96 cm] on a 34″ [86.5 cm], 5’5″ [165 cm] tall model (3 ¾” [9.5 cm] positive ease)

Materials

  • Quince & Co Sparrow: 6 (7, 7, 8, 9, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) skeins
  • 3.25mm/US3 – 24″ circular needles
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 24″ circular needles
  • Pattern




PROJECT Kalaloch

Kalaloch

I kinda love the slouchy, deconstructed quality of this sweater. Texture replaces colourwork in the yoke, evoking a fair-isle sweaters without creating the bulk of layers of yarn. It’s a light, easy to wear spring & summer top. It’s meant to fit oversized, so take that into account when choosing your size.

The body and sleeves of this pullover are worked in the round from the bottom up to the yoke, then the pieces are joined for working the circular yoke. If you haven’t already read about the yarn, BC Garn Bio Balance, (if you have you can skip ahead to the next section … seriously, it’s a copy-cut-paste) it’s soft, light, comfortable, and comes in a great selection of colours. It’s a 100% organic and GOTS certified blend of cotton & wool, and kind of feels the way I’ve always wanted cotton to feel (but doesn’t). And FYI, the GOTS certification is a real THING. It means the product is truly organic and humanely handled from the field to the distributor (once it hits the store shelves it’s an ethical free-for-all, choose your yarn pusher wisely). BTW, there’s a lot of yardage on these little skeins, so PLEASE feel free to ask us to wind it for you before shipping or picking it up.

Size

  • Circumference at Underarm:  42 (48, 54, 60, 66)“
  • Pullover shown measures 48”; modeled with 15” of positive ease.

Materials

  • BC Garn Bio Balance: 6 (7, 8, 8, 9) skeins (colour 05)
  • 2.75 mm/US2 – 40″ circular needles
  • 3.5 mm/US4 – 40” circular needles
  • 2.75 mm/US2 double-pointed needles
  • 3.5 mm/US4 double-pointed needles
  • 3.5 mm/US4 – 16” circular needles
  • 3.5 mm/US4 – 24″ circular needles
  • stitch markers
  • stitch holders or scrap yarn
  • tapestry needle
  • Pattern

Hacks

  • Check your local library’s online resources to see if they offer this magazine digitally
  • If you were thinking about investing in a set of interchangeable needles this might be a good time. Chiaogoo makes sets that go as small as 2.75mm/US2 (both a Half Set that goes up to 5mm/US8 and a Full Set that goes up to 10mm/US15). If you get the 4″ tips you can use them to make 16″/hat sized needles.

PROJECT Baker’s Twine Dish Pot Holder

Baker’s Twine Pot Holder

Hi guys! I’m sorry I’ve been away so long, I am very well, just busy in the store …. you’ve been very graciously keeping me on my toes! I’ve been arranging orders for pick-up and shipping, over the phone, email, our online store and even through Facebook messenger! I’m very proud to report that many blankets have been conceived in the last week, many colours have been combined, consulted, and recombined. Much yarn has been wound.

I have a few minutes before the phone rings and my email is quiet, so I thought I’d show you my very small project. I saw the Baker’s Twine Pot Holder on Ravelry and it kind of appealed … plus it’s a small, easy project not requiring too much bandwidth.

I’m test-driving a new yarn, Borgo de’ Pazzi Amore Cotton. It’s a very affordable bulky weight, recycled cotton that’s made in Italy. It comes in marled colours and I thought it would make a good craft yarn for dish cloths and such. I think one skein is going to be enough for my square pot-holder, it’s 10″ wide and I’m knitting it tight on small needles. Unfortunately, I haven’t has the time to photograph all the colours, but they’re pretty straightforward (pink & white is what you’d imagine … pink & white).

The little aqua ring is made with Kelbourne Woolens Mojave … I love their bright colours and the lovely texture. Mojave is a blend of cotton and linen and it’s just a lovely combo. The ring was actually kind of interesting, it’s constructed in the round first and then you knit the fabric around it.

Hacks

  • Use slippery metal needles. The tight tension made things harder on wood needles.
  • I book-ended my slip-stitch sections with stitch markers. The dual-colour system you see in the picture isn’t actually necessary, I think I had a bit of ‘pandemic brain-fog’ when I started and I was getting disoriented. Now that I’m better seated in this transitional period I look at the markers and I’m like “What? Why did you think that was a complicated concept?” Still, while it was ultimately unnecessary, I’m impressed with my little system.
  • If you want a smaller piece you can omit one pattern repeat (12 sts) and it should come out around 7.75″ to 8″ wide.

Materials

Quick Haley Update

Just a quick Haley update … I’m here in the store and I’m well. I’ve been paying a lot of attention to caring for myself, both physically and mentally. I’ve been making a point of exercising and eating properly to buttress my immune system. Mentally, I’ve made a point to slow down and let myself adjust to the experience. I’ve also expanded my meditation practice. As for mindfulness, I’m trying to lean into the experience, let myself really go into it, absorb and process all I can get from it.

Not that that’s an easygoing thing. Life has been “Go!Go!Go!STOP”, which is both exhilarating and a bit taxing. Adapting to this pandemic has been like going through the stages of grief – I think I’m mostly in acceptance (or I could be completely in denial, but I don’t think so).

Several people have suggested I host events on Zoom or host online classes, but I am being pulled inwards now more than ever. My need to connect with myself and ground myself is strong. I know a lot of people are struggling with feeling disconnected and are looking to connect with others through digital media. For what it’s worth, that isn’t my calling. I can’t connect with others if I’m not connected with myself, I can’t love others if I don’t love myself. I view this as a period of transition, and I’m letting the currents make their changes and transform me. We all get the experiences we need to grow.

Anyway, I’m still here for you, and those of you who need me are definitely reaching out. But I’m letting the way I’m here evolve and recalibrate naturally.