Category Archives: lace

PRE-ORDER KIT Adara Pullover

Adara PRE-ORDER

PRE-ORDER KIT (see below for details)

As soon as I saw Adara I thought “Hello sweetie, you’re going to be my next favourite sweater!” Then I swatched with the yarn and I KNEW it. Berroco Lucca is a new blend of cashmere and cotton, and it is so soft and buttery – I have a feeling that once you put this sweater on you’ll never want to take it off (you may even want to make another in a different colour). It isn’t just a perfect closet staple, its the sweater of your heart.

The design features all over garter stitch with slightly leafy looking lace panels up the sides and arms. Rolled edges finish things off and add a modern, simple polish. Adara is worked flat in pieces and seamed (seams give a sweater stability and structure, which is helpful with a fibre blend of cashmere and cotton … if you’re going to spend the time and money to make a cashmere sweater, it should be beautiful too). The lace pattern is charted.

Newsletter Special: 10% Off, use code KITSTOGO at check-out!

The Yarn

Berroco Lucca is a luxurious, soft and buttery yarn made in Italy from a blend of premium cashmere and cotton. It has beautiful stitch definition and soft drape, and it’s perfect for making just about anything you want to touch your skin (sweaters, shawls & wraps, cowls, hats, scarves, mitts, blankets – you name it. The colour is very delicately marled, giving the finished knit a bit of subtle dimension while still keeping that classic cashmere look. Lucca is definitely a yarn you’ll want to come back to over and over again … I’m so convinced of this that this kit includes the entire Digital eBook: Berroco no. 426 Lucca (you’re going to want to make more).

Lucca is worsted weight and normally knits 20sts/4″(10cm) on 4.5mm/US7 needles. Lucca is machine washable (not often something a cashmere does well), but lay it flat to dry.  

Note: If you love this pattern but the yarn is a little too precious, we can work with you to make up a kit for you in another yarn – just contact us!

PRE-ORDER NOTE

These kits are a SPECIAL PRE-ORDER – we aren’t stocking them in the store on a regular basis, but you have the option to order them at any time (it will be available to purchase as long as the manufacturer makes it available to us). Your kit will ship or be available for pick-up once it arrives, and we will contact you. If you need your kit for a specific date please let us know and we can find out if it’s feasible. 

FYI: The yarn mills still aren’t up and running at full capacity, international shipping is still lagging, and it’s going to be another hit-or-miss year in terms of availability from distributors. If you want something in a particular colour I suggest you order early, shipments are already a bit backed up.

Size

  • Finished Bust: (36, 40, 44) [48, 52, 56] {60, 64, 68}” / (91.5, 101.5, 112) [122, 132, 142] {152.5, 162.5, 173} cm
  • Length: (23, 23½, 23½) [24, 24, 24½] {25, 25½, 26}” / (58.5, 59.5, 59.5) [61, 61, 62] {63.5, 65, 66} cm
  • Shown in size 40″ / 101.5 cm. Recommended ease: 2–4″ / 5–10 cm positive ease.

Gauge

  • 18 sts and 32 rows = 4″ / 10 cm in Garter St on larger needles
  • 20 sts and 32 rows = 4″ / 10 cm over Sleeve Chart on larger needles
  • 15 sts = 3″ / 7.5 cm over Body Chart on larger needles

Kit Includes

Kit DOES NOT Include

PROJECTS Kestrel Lace

Quince & Co Kestrel is 15% Off until June 19th!

Quince & Co Kestrel has been a customer favourite for years … good things never go out of style. It’s an aran weight, organic linen, so it knits up quickly and easily. It’s machine washable, perfect for warm-weather garments. It makes beautiful, simple stocking stitch fabric, but it also knits up as a stunning lace. Quince & Co Kestrel is 15% Off until June 19th

Kestrel Patterns Featuring Lace

Hacienda

Hacienda is a modular knitted stole with a lovely drape and texture. The unique construction of Kestrel is a perfect fit for Bristol’s unique and fearless sense of design. All of these elements come together beautifully in this fun to knit, and fun to wear, piece.

The wrap is designed with Quince & Co Kestrel, an extremely versatile, aran weight 100% organic linen (I don’t know if you get more environmentally without hugging a tree). It knits beautifully, easily and fast, it’s machine washable (in a delicate bag), and softens up COMPLETELY after washing. If you want to maintain the crispness in the picture above you’ll need to wash by hand, lay flat to dry, and press (a little spritz of Soak Flatter won’t hurt either). Because of the textile, this wrap is great for cooler summer nights, people who winter in a warmer climate, or for anyone who can’t wear wool and wants something really nice.

Size

14½” [37 cm] wide and 60″ [152.5 cm] long

Materials

Skills

Cable cast on, picking up stitches (links provided); increasing, decreasing. Construction diagram included.

Fernwood

Fernwood is a pretty tank with an elegant, scalloped lace edge. Designed with Quince & Co Kestrel and 6mm/US10 needles, it’ll whip up quickly, so you can wear it all summer!

Size

  • 31(33, 35, 37, 39, 41.5, 44, 46.5, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 62.5, 64, 66, 69.5, 73)” or 78.5 (84, 89, 94, 99, 105.5, 112, 118, 124.5, 132, 139.5, 147.5, 155, 159, 162.5, 167.5, 176.5, 185.5) cm
  • Intended to be work with -2 to +2”/-5 to + 5 cm positive ease
  • Linen is VERY stretchy, especially after being washed. Consider going down a size.

Materials

Mira

Mira is an open tee is a great layering piece for summer. The oversized shape and relaxed gauge aim for maximum drape, which is then compounded by eyelets and garter stitch. There’s very little shaping in this piece, making for a relaxing knit. The fit is very oversized and the tension is loose, but if you want something a bit smaller and firmer try going down in needle size to a 5mm/US8 or 5.5mm/US9.

Size

  • Bust Circumference: 54 (60¾, 66, 72¾)” or 137 (154.5, 167.5, 185) cm
  • Shown in size 54″ [137 cm] on a 34″ [86.5 cm] on a 5’8″ [172.5 cm] tall model with 20″ [51 cm] positive ease
  • Designed to be worn with 16-24″ [40-60 cm] positive ease

Materials

Skills

Long-tail cast on, sloped bind off, cable cast on, three-needle bind off (links provided); increasing, decreasing. Charts and line-by-line instructions included.

Sandshore

Sandshore is a seamless cardigan worked from the top down. A clean mesh lace forms an intersection down the back, set slightly asymmetrically for interest. The Kestrel knits up quickly and is a smooth, dry summer yarn. I’ve found Kestrel is extremely stretchy knit at this tension, consider going down one or two sizes in the pattern.

Size

  • 31 (35, 39, 43, 47, 51, 55, 59, 63, 67)” or 79 (89, 99, 109, 119, 129, 139, 150, 160, 170) cm

Materials

PROJECT Ashtona

Ashtona

The Yarn

I usually lead with details about the pattern, but when you’re using Quince & Co Sparrow the main character in the story is always the yarn. Sparrow is one of my absolute favourite summer yarns, I never ever get tired of wearing the garments I make with it and I’m always planning my next project with it in the back of my head. It’s the best linen I’ve ever come across, once it is washed it is deliciously soft, cool, light and comfortable. It’s not that I don’t work with other yarns, it’s just that this is just the one I always go back to. I have two sweaters made with it and I wear them as soon as the weather gets warm – they’re like my summer uniform. I need to make a third this year because I need it in another colour (which is really the only thing that’s been holding me up).

Sparrow is organic, made in Italy, and is machine washable. I generally machine wash mine in a delicate bag (to keep it from abrading) and machine dry it on low in the bag. (The label says to lay it flat to dry, but I like it better if it’s been in the dryer at least a little).

Yarn Substitutions

If you’re not a linen person and you’re never going to be a linen person, I get it. but you want to make a shawl, my favourite sub would be Fibre Co Meadow, cause it’s gorgeous and you’re going to LURV making and wearing your project. BC Garn Bio Balance would make a slightly more casual look, and the wrap would be a smidge warmer (it’ll bring the price-point down too – $52). For a more rustic look and a really affordable project, try Berroco Remix Light, you only need two skeins (only $32).

The Pattern

The pattern, Ashtona, is an asymmetrical, sideways knit shawl. It combines combines pretty ribbon lace with an uneven ribbing motif – think waves lapping against a shoreline grooved with tiny rivulets and ripples in the sand. The piece is worked on the bias from the right tip to the wide left edge. Both charts and line-by-line instructions included.

You can see all of the patterns designed with Quince & Co Sparrow HERE

By the way, Quince & Co has a gorgeous website. If you’re in the mood to stroll online and look at beautiful photos of wonderful designs, I highly recommend it.

Skill Level: Intermediate (see below for a list with links) – I wouldn’t make this as your first lace project, there might be a few too many hoops to jump through, but it should be fine for a second.

Size: 80″ (203 cm) wingspan and 22″ (56 cm) deep at centre

Materials

Skills

STORE HOURS Victoria Day + Summer Hours

Porcupine lace Washcloth by Jennifer Hansen, featuring a mid-Victorian lace pattern

Victoria Day Weekend

Saturday May 22: 11 am to 5pm

Sunday May 23: CLOSED

Monday May 24: CLOSED

Porcupine Lace Wash Cloth

Crochet Grocery Bag by Knit-O-Matic

Summer Store Hours: May 23 to Sept 13

We’re shifting over to our Summer Store Hours after the Victoria Day long weekend, so please note that we are CLOSED ON SUNDAYS. We go back to the regular store schedule the week of September 13th.

Monday to Saturday: 11 am to 5pm

Sunday: CLOSED

Crochet Grocery Bag

PROJECTS Hikari Collection Fibre Co Meadow

While trolling for inspiration I found this really need little capsule collection for Fibre Co. Meadow by Japanese designer michiyo. I was really impressed, the designer clearly understands the fabric and makes the most of it’s natural lightness and drape. Meadow is a gorgeous yarn, a heavy lace-weight made with a very yummy blend of baby llama, silk, linen and merino wool. It’s great for layering pieces, light sweaters, and shaws and wraps.

Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in colour Fennel

Tsumuzikaze

Besides that fact that it’s a great combination of interesting, different and beautiful, I that this top looks really good on lots of people (see the finished projects HERE)! Tsumuzikaze is a Japanese word that means whirlwind, the design inspiration for this lovely pattern with an asymmetrical ‘whirling’ hem. This pullover is worked from the top down in the round. An eyelet pattern on the shoulders are worked as increases. The sleeves are worked separately, then in the round from the armhole. The lower edge is shaped with short rows.

Photos by michiyo, shown in colour Indigo

Size

  • To Fit Actual Bust Circumference up to: S 83(32¾), M 92(36¼), L 103(40½), XL 113(44½)
  • Finished bust: 102 (110, 120, 146) cm 40 (43¼, 47¼, 57¼) in
  • Finished Length: 62 (65.5, 70.5, 74) cm 24½ (25¾, 27¾, 29¼) in
  • Finished Hem circumference: 76 (80, 88, 99) cm 30 (31½, 34¾, 39)in
Photos by CozySunny Day, shown in colour Bellflower

Materials

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Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in colour Gentian Violet
Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in colour Gentian Violet

Kagerou

When I first saw this project I didn’t realize that it was a vest! It’s like a cross between a tank and a vest … a Vank Top? A Test Top? Is it a waistcoat? Feel free to throw in your two cents! Whatever it’s called, it is worked from the bottom up; the fronts and back are worked together back and forth up to the armhole, then the yokes are worked separately.  Short rows are then worked to make the back longer than the front. The back, left front and right front of the upper body are worked separately on smaller needles in a rib pattern. Finally the shoulders are joined and the piece is finished by adding buttons and blocking gently.

Photos by Handknitlife, shown in colour Pokeweed

Size

  • To Fit Actual Bust Circumference up to : S 83cm(32¾), M 92cm(36¼), L 103cm(40½), XL 113cm(44½)
  • Finished Bust: 90 (92, 102, 113) cm or 35½ (36¼, 40, 44) in
  • Finished Length (back): 70 (71, 73.5, 77) cm or 27½ (28, 29, 30¼) in
  • Finished Shoulder width: 32 (33, 36, 38) cm or 12½ (13, 14¼, 15) in
  • Finished Hem circumference: 142 (146, 162.5, 178.5) cm or 56 (57½, 64, 70¼) in

Materials

Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in Larkspur for MC and Pennyroyal for CC

Kinomi

Kinomi is a light top designed with minimal shaping and lots of flow. The pattern is written for two lengths; the shorter version is illustrated, whilst the longer version is designed to cover the hip.  Kinomi is worked in pieces separately from the bottom up. The neck band is made in two pieces in a contrasting colour with the ends grafted and then sewn onto the body. Ribbing is added to the armholes and the piece is finishing with light steaming. 

Photos by roko, show in Bedstraw for MC and Queen Annes Lace for CC

Size

  • To Fit Actual Bust Circumference up to: S 83(32¾), M 92(36¼), L 103(40½), XL 113(44½)
  • Finished bust: 115 (124, 133, 142.5) cm 45¼ (48¾, 52¼, 56) in
  • Short length: 53.5 (54.5, 56, 57.5) cm 21 (21½, 22, 22½) in
  • Long length: 71.5 (72, 76.5, 78) cm 28 (28¼, 30, 30¾) in
  • Centre back neck to cuff: 35 (37, 39, 41.5) cm 13¾ (14½, 15¼, 16¼) in
  • Hem circumference: 152.5 (163.5, 174.5, 185) cm 60 (64¼, 68¾, 72¾) in

Materials

Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in colour Alfalfa

Mori

Light and romantic, this cardigan is the perfect topper for sunny spring days and cool summer nights. It can be worn as a cardigan or a cape/shawl. This pattern is worked from the top down seamlessly and the lace is charted.

Photos by LilyLilyLily, shown in colour Prairie

Size

  • To Fit Actual Bust Circumference up to: S 83(32¾), M 92(36¼), L 103(40½), XL 113(44½)
  • Finished bust: 99 (105, 116, 128) cm 39 (41¼, 45¾, 50½) in
  • Finished Length: 44.5 (45.5, 47.5, 50) cm 17½ (18, 18¾, 19¾) in
  • Finished Centre back neck to cuff: 70 (72, 74.5, 77) cm 27½ (28¼, 29¼, 30¼) in
  • Finished Hem circumference: 155.5 (166, 182.5, 204) cm 61¼ (65¼, 71¾, 80¼) in

Materials

Photos by Tommy Martin, shown in colour Ladyslipper

Rourou

Rourou is a Japanese word that means hazy light, the kind that filters through the leaves of trees on a sunny summer day. The front and back of Rourou are worked in pieces separately from the bottom up creating the sleeves at the same time with side increases.

Photo by cosysunnyday, show in colour Queen Anne’s Lace

Size

  • To Fit Actual Bust Circumference up to: S 83(32¾), M 92(36¼), L 103(40½), XL 113(44½)
  • Finished bust: 110 (120, 130, 140) cm 43¼ (47¼, 51¼, 55) in
  • Length: 58.5 (60, 61.5, 62.5) cm 23 (23¾, 24¼, 24½) in
  • Centre back neck to cuff: 38.5 (41, 43, 46) cm 15¼ (16¼, 17, 18¼) in

Materials

PROJECT Treit

Treit

When I came across this project it immediately struck me as a great little summer tee … an it would be PERFECT made with Quince & Co Sparrow. Treit is a light tee, worked bottom up, with a cropped length and leafy lace yoke. After a few rounds of twisted rib at the collar, the cropped body (which can be knit longer if desired) is knitted to the underarms. Two sleeve caps are knitted, body and sleeves are joined, and the yoke is worked from a lace chart to the neck. There are optional instruction to raise the back of the neck neck with short rows (a nice feature for more experienced knitters, and great that it isn’t necessary for those who need to keep thins KISSasble (you remember K.I.S.S., right? I refer to the sage life advice, “Keep It Simple Stupid”, not the 70’s band with the black & white getups.)

P.S. Quince & Co Sparrow is ON SALE until the end of July!

Suggestions

A. If you want to reproduce the ‘tweedy’ texture, use one of ‘Marled’ colours (they are marked in the drop-down menu of colours on our site). If you aren’t so keen on it, that’s cool too, just use one of the regular colours for a more refined finish.

B. I would DEFINITELY suggest the use a lifeline when knitting this project. Linen is slippey, and lace is lace, so do yourself a favour and give yourself a safety-net. If you are not already familiar with this concept, now’s the time to add this very, very handy little hack to your “I wish I knew that BEFORE ….” life list.

Size

  • Finished bust circumference: 33 (35, 38, 41, 45, 48, 51, 54, 57, 60) inches or 84 (89, 96.5, 104, 114.5, 122, 129.5, 137, 145, 152.5) cm
  • The pattern recommends you choose the next size up from your normal bust size, but linen is very stretchy, so if you plan to wear this top over a tank or cami you may want to take that into consideration and not size-up.

Materials

  • Quince & Co Sparrow: 4 (4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7 8, 9) skeins
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 24″ & 29″circular (or longer for larger sizes) longer and below gauge-size circular needles of
  • 3.25mm/US3 (or 3mm) – 16″ & 29″circular (or longer for larger sizes)
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 12″ circular needles (or double pointed needles)
  • 3.25mm/US3 (or 3mm) – 12″ circular needles (or double pointed needles)
  • Stitch markers in two colours
  • Waste yarn (for putting stitches on hold)
  • thin waste yarn to use as a lace “lifeline”
  • Pattern

Sweater Quantities

To make life easier, here’s a list of colours that we have in relevant sweater quantities … well, at least at the time of publishing … once it goes live it’s in the hands of a higher power (the yarn gods?):

  • Butternut
  • Eclipse (first 2 sizes)
  • Fen
  • Frond MARL (up to 6th size)
  • Fundi
  • Little Fern (first 2 sizes)
  • Lunar
  • Maize
  • Mineral MARL
  • Rille MARL
  • Rosa Mundi MARL
  • Sans
  • Surf MARL 253 (up to 8th size)
  • Venice 218 (first 2 sizes)
  • Viburnum (first 2 sizes)

PROJECT Laudholm

Laudholm

Something classic and cool for summer makes me very happy. It’s knit with Quince & Co Sparrow, one of my favourite yarns for summer. It feels soft and cool on your skin, washes beautifully in the machine, and just kind of *flows*.

Note: Linen can be quite stretchy once it is washed, so be sure to swatch a square at least 5″ x 5″ and wash it before you measure your tension. You may also want to make a smaller size than normal, I usually go down one size.

Size

  • Finished Bust: 34 ¾ (37 ¾ , 40 ¾ , 43 3⁄4, 46 ¾ , 50, 53, 56, 59, 62)” [88.5 (96, 103.5, 111, 118.5, 127, 134.5, 142, 150, 157.5) cm]
  • Shown in size 37 ¾ ” [96 cm] on a 34″ [86.5 cm], 5’5″ [165 cm] tall model (3 ¾” [9.5 cm] positive ease)

Materials

  • Quince & Co Sparrow: 6 (7, 7, 8, 9, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) skeins
  • 3.25mm/US3 – 24″ circular needles
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 24″ circular needles
  • Pattern




IN PROGRESS Love Note (on my needles)

Love Note

I have fallen seriously behind in my COVID knitting … you know how it goes, make plans and universe laughs. I pulled some sexy yarn from my ‘stash’ and have been working on Love Note. I know fuzzy isn’t really spring but hey, my pandemic, my rules. My sweater is not the pink one, that belongs to the pattern designer, mine is the dark one in progress below.

I finished the body last night and tried it on and it looked amazing! I’m feeling motivated to finish the arms and wear it – it feels light as air, it should be great over a cami. The lace looks really pretty, I’m not really a lace person, but it isn’t too much, and it’s in the right place. There is a sort of high front/lower back thing going on, if you aren’t into it you can skip it, although I would put in at least half of the short rows to even out the front & back. The pattern has both a cropped and full length version, I’m making the adult size XS in the full length (see below for interesting things about size), I added a 1/2 inch, and it’s still on the short side style-wise. I highly advise trying on your sweater before starting the short rows. BTW, the lace is fairly simple, and the pattern comes with both a chart and the written instructions.

The pattern uses a thin mohair held with a fingering weight yarn, but I’m not really up for mohair (itchy), so I have subbed a ‘blown yarn’ with baby alpaca. Blown means it has a knitted core and the alpaca is literally blown into it with a machine. It makes an extremely light, airy yarn that has some depth to it. I’m using Illimani Amelie, but you can also use the very similar and quite affordable Drops Air (or if you want I’ll special order you some Amelie, it’s super yummy scrummy sexy (I don’t have any in store right now, it costs $24/skein).

Size

The pattern is EXTREMELY size inclusive, it runs from a baby 0-6 months up to an adult 5XL (72″ bust). I’m thinking matching mommy/baby sweaters? Sibling sweaters? Cousin sweaters? BFF sweaters? The opportunities are endless. The baby and child sizes are an ideal opportunity to use Drops Air – my mom always said you can put a baby in anything, that they can’t complain, but I beg to differ – they seem to be adept at wailing their adorable little heads off for as long as they feel uncomfortable.

  • 0-6 mo (6-12 mo, 1-2 yrs, 2-4 yrs, 4-6 yrs, 6-8 yrs, 8-10 yrs, Adult XS, S, M, L, XL-XXL, 3XL-4XL, 5XL)
  • Finished Chest Measurement: 24.5 (25.5, 26.5, 28.6, 30.5, 32.5, 34.5, 38.5, 41.5, 44.5, 48.5, 56.5, 66.5, 72.5”)

Materials

  • Drops Air (cropped version): 2 (2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 8, 9) skeins
  • Drops Air (regular version): 2 (2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) skeins
  • 6mm/US10 circular needles (length depends on the size you’re making, interchangeable needles are good for this project)
  • 4.5mm/US7 circular needles
  • 6mm/US10 double pointed needles (or alternative)
  • 4.5mm/US7 double pointed needles (or alternative)
  • scrap yarn
  • stitch markers (optional but useful in the lace)
  • Pattern

Connecting

Sorry we haven’t connected in a while, I’ve been working hard and am healthy and happy. You know how it is, this experience is wearing on the most resilient of us – going eyeball to eyeball with fear and vulnerability is challenging. Anyway, I haven’t been feeling myself lately, but I think that’s ok, I’m growing into something new, so I’m just sort of letting myself marinate. I saw my niece and nephew for the first time since before march break and found they have grown … they used to fight like cats & dogs and now they’re BFFs (it only took a month and a half of being locked in together). They got bigger too, but that’s a given.. they’re kids. Anyway, here’s what I’ve been up to (should you be interested):

Reading: The Power of Now by Ekhart Tolle (audiobook) … I just started this on Sunday and it’s the kind of book that you’re going to read over and over as you grow. I think it’s also the kind of book that you don’t read until you’re ready for it. I wouldn’t say the material is over my head, but I’ve got some work ahead of me.

Watching: Star Trek: The Next Generation (on Netflix) … most, but not all of it stands up. Picard is still great, but why isn’t Troi in a uniform?! I mean, is she a civilian? Is she starfleet?

Listening: Tara Brach podcast …. I’ve wandered from her excellent weekly pandemic support content and have crawled into the back-catalogue from B.C. (ie. before covid). The episodes on Radical Compassion from December 2019 are excellent, this morning I was listening to Desire and Addiction from March 2020.

Discussing: The Zombie Apocalypse … apparently I’m not on my beau’s Zombie Apocalypse ‘team’ and he’s throwing me under the bus. On the upside, he says the team will eat me. I don’t really blame him, I can’t run and I bruise easily. Anyway, I don’t really want to be around for the Zombie Apocalypse anyway, it sounds stressy and low on crafts. Other topics of interest include washing our winter coats … is there anything better than sucking the air out of the storage bag containing your winter coats? That’s a feeling worth savouring!

Cooking: Instant Pot Chicken Adobo. Yummy, simple and easy! Serve with Rice and a veggie. Freeze in batches for quick prep later.

Working On: Making vulnerability my BFF … according to researcher Brené Brown in Daring Greatly: “Vulnerability is the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity. It is the source of hope, empathy, accountability, and authenticity. If we want greater clarity in our purpose or deeper and more meaningful spiritual lives, vulnerability is the path.”

xox Haley

Stash Game

Yay!!! Inaugural Stash Game! I hope this is a fun diversion!

Back-Story

StashGame is a virtual game where you send me a photo and description of your stashed, long neglected yarn and I’ll come up with at least one project idea for it and publish it here. There’s one hitch – you can’t request a type of project.

To enter, please send the following:

  • A clear photo of your yarn. It helps if I can get an idea about the colour as well as the texture (natural sunlight is best for taking pictures).
  • The name of your yarn (brand name and product name: for example Berroco Vintage)
  • The yarn’s weight (ex. 100g) and yardage (ex. 200m/220yds)
  • The yarn’s tension (ex. 18 sts & 24 rows = 4″)
  • The yarn’s suggested needle size
  • If available, the yarn’s Ravelry page: (ex. https://www.ravelry.com/yarns/library/berroco-vintage)
  • How much yarn you have
  • How long the yarn has been in your stash (I’m just curious)
  • Any interesting or pertinent back-story (if it has an interesting one). Was it a gift from someone special? Did you inherit it from your grandmother? Do you love it? Are you afraid of it? Do you hate it? (please note: if you hate it you should probably just break up with it and send it on to a better place)

Send your info through any of the following channels with the subject/hashtag #StashGame:

Please Welcome Our First Guest!

The first yarn looks to be a gorgeous 100% silk, fingering weight, single ply hand-dye:

  • Woollisa Silk Singles (we think, the ball-band is kinda spartan)
  • 100% silk, hand dyed in Italy
  • 100g/400m
  • Fingering weight
  • Suggested needles 3.5mm/US4 to4mm/US8
  • Notes: received as a gift by a beloved friend 7 years ago

Why This Yarn?

This yarn spoke to me for a few reasons:

  1. The owner has been afraid to use it, which means it’s time for them to use it.
  2. The type of fibre – it has a lot of limitations.

Category: Too Precious

This is a great example of the ‘Too Precious to Use’ stashed yarn. These yarns linger in our stashes for years, sometimes decades, waiting for the perfect project and the perfect pattern at the perfect time. We know we will receive a sign revealing what we are supposed to make with it, we just need to wait until all the planets and all their moons align ….

The entry point for this type of yarn problem is the descriptor PERFECT. In situations like this we’ve put this skein on a pedestal so high nobody could ever reach it, and unless you’re prepared to bring it down and live in the real, messy world, you might as well put it under glass. Don’t worry, I’ve been here, I’ve done it, I survived to tell the tale (it isn’t especially interesting).

Spoiler, if you are of the mind that perfectionism is a good thing, you’ll probably prefer to skip to the next section where I talk about the fibre.

So here’s the hitch – it doesn’t actually matter what you make with this yarn, because as long as it is on the perfection pedestal it will NEVER feel like it’s good enough or doing the yarn justice. So, you’ve got a choice, keep the yarn in it’s a safe little bubble of too-goodness, or use it and put yourself face to face with the uncomfortable feeling of not-good-enoughness. If you choose to move forward and use the yarn you’ll be putting yourself in a position of growth … but hey, it’s only string, it isn’t alive, so the experience shouldn’t be painful, just slightly uncomfortable and take you outside of your comfort zone.

One thing I suggest for getting this project off the ground is to reframe it, take the focus off of the self. Don’t use this yarn for making something for yourself, use it to make something for someone else. Since it was a gift from a beloved friend, I would make something for the person who gave it to me.

Project Limitations: Silk is Gonna Silk

This yarn is made from 100% Silk, which comes with its own set of issues. Silk has absolutely no memory, and it actually tends to grow with use. The more silk content in your yarn, the less shape it will likely hold. This means that it isn’t going to be useful for making anything that needs to have a shape or keep its shape. Hats, socks, fingerless gloves are all out and sweaters are tricky because of the growth factor. This sort of limits the types of projects that will work out successfully. The yarn is also thin, so wraps, scarves, wrappy-scarves, scarfy-wraps and shawls are the best options for a yarn like this. Types of lace where the yarn is wrapped around itself will bulk it up a little.

The silk will look good with lace, it won’t hold cables so if a design includes that it would have to be very deconstructed. This yarn is lovely and should probably be used on it’s own so it can shine. I would use pointy needles for this yarn, it will help scooping it up when you make your stitches. I would also advise using wood or less slippery needles, it will probably reduce accidents. Definitely be diligent and use a lifeline.

Herald

My suggestion for this yarn is the Herald wrap. I like the modernity of this openwork lace. It’s simple, timeless, and elegant. Plus, the yarn is a bright pink, so it’s going to dominate. Herald is worked on the bias as a scalene triangle, so it can be worn as a scarf or as a wrap, and has a cool asymmetrical sensibility (this translates to “easy to make, interesting to wear”). This lace also makes the most of the yardage available and doesn’t suck any up in a dense stitch like garter-stitch.

Materials

  • 400m of fingering weight yarn (my current favorite choice would be Fibre Company Meadow)
  • 4mm/US6 needles
  • tapestry needle
  • scrap yarn for lifeline (optional but advised)
  • Pattern

Stash Conclusions

1. I think I need to do a reassessment of my stash and see how much of it is in the “Too Precious to Use” category. I’m sure I’m DEEP down this rabbit hole!

2. Currently, we’re are all already well outside of our comfort zones, and I know it sounds strange, but now is actually the perfect time to push yourself further. Our fears are running rampant right now, and we want to avoid those feelings because they are extremely uncomfortable, but it’s actually ok to accept them. Fear is part of being a human being. If we hold on to the fear we get stuck in it (which I think is really just being mean to ourselves), when we accept it then it passes through us. This video by Tara Brach on dealing with pandemic fears is excellent.

3. The best way to get out of your head FAST is to think about how you can help others – it clears out an immense amount of space! Now is a great time to make gifts for others …. the holidays will come, I promise you, and next fall you’ll be thrilled to have already finished your gifts. You can also make gifts for right now for the people you care about, and help them get through this tough time.

PROJECT Decemberist

Decemberist

Please meet our latest success, Decemberist! I’ve been eyeballing this pattern for a while and figured “What have I got to loose?!” It knits fast with super thick yarn on 9mm/US13 needles (or larger if your yarn is accommodating). We used 3 balls of Drops Andes in colour 8112, an icy blue, so it was a pretty affordable project too ($33). The pattern was straight-forward, and the lace is given in both written instructions and as a chart – it probably fits into an advanced-beginner/intermediate skill level, and would probably make a decent introduction to lace knitting for anyone wanting to expand and explore.

Overall, I think it is a very successful project, and it would make a great holiday gift knit (I kind of like that it looks like a substantial sized gift, even though it’s light on cost and labour). If you know someone with a cottage it would make an amazing wrap to snuggle up in at night or at the end of the season. Women who work in cold offices will also appreciate one of these. I also think that this wrap is so pretty that when your friends/family/colleagues see you wearing this they are going to ask you to make them one, so you might as well get ahead of the curve and start early. Will it look a little strange seeing the women in your office walking around wearing the same wrap in different colours? Maybe, but the Pointer Sisters rocked the look, so I say own it and be your best, favourite you!

Yarn

Drops Andes is a comfortable, lofty 2ply blend of Alpaca and Peruvian Wool. It’s soft to the touch, and kind of feels like what I always wish wool actually felt like – that stage that is just short of the buttery soft texture you normally find with a fine merino or baby alpaca. All of the colours are lovely, but I think the pattern would look especially good in the following:

  • Greys: 519 Dark Grey Mix, 9020 Light Grey Mix, 9015 Grey Mix, 8465 Medium Grey (solid)
  • Neutrals: 100 Off White (naturalish), 1101 White (cream), 206 Light Beige Mix, 619 Beige Mix (oatmeal)
  • Pale/Soft Colours: 8112 Ice Blue, 7120 Light Grey Green, 4276 Misty Rose Mix, 41010 Grey Lilac

Decemberist would also be exquisite knit in a single ply merino like Malabrigo Rasta (5 skeins) and Cascade Spuntaneous (3 skeins). Both yarns can be pushed up to a 12mm/US17 needle.

How to Grow Yours Decemberist

If you want to make yours larger the easiest way is to use a slightly thicker yarn with a larger needle. Malabrigo Rasta (5 skeins) and Cascade Spuntaneous (3 skeins) would both be great yarns to sub, and you can go up to a 12mm/US17 needle with both of them. Unless you are a tight knitter, I would NOT increase the needle size for the Drops Andes; after blocking the fabric flows and drapes, its a beautiful tension (around 9 sts over 4″/10cm).

If you feel confident with your mathimagical abilities, you can also upsize the pattern by increasing the amount of stocking stitch you work before starting the lace. You’ll need to add an extra 36 sts to the stocking stitch section (so you’ll need to do an extra 6 repeats for “Section 1”, which would add an extra 12 rows). Depending on your tension, this should give you about an extra 3.75″/9.5cm of depth and about 16″/40cm in width.

Materials

If you don’t already own 9mm/US13 needles (or larger) this might be a great opportunity to buy some Knitters Pride Interchangeable needles. You’ll need a long cable for this project, which is something you may not get a lot of use out of in the future (unless you’re going to get into making Bulky Blankets, which are awesome things in their own right). With interchangeable needles one pair of tips can become any length of circular needle from 24″ to 60″, and extra cords are a very reasonable $3.97 each (instead of $20 to $35 for a new pair of needles with a different length cord).

Conclusions

This project is a two thumbs up! It’s pretty, fast, not too complicated, affordable, and giftable. I’m thinking about trying it again in Malabrigo Rasta in 429 Cape Cod Grey, but I’ll wait a month or so in case you guys need the yarn.