Category Archives: sweaters

NEW Sweaters in Kelbourne Scout

Because of COVID we had to wait a little extra time for Kelbourne Scout (it was supposed to arrive in August but the Peruvians have been kit hard by the pandemic), but we’re grateful we waited! There were so many inspiring project ideas designed with Scout that we’re breaking them up into two segments – we’ll start with the sweater projects and then move on to the accessories after (hopefully this will give the sweater knitters a chance to scoop up the yarn they need for a larger project).

Kelbourne Woolens Scout

Kelbourne Scout is a classic yarn for the sake of yarn. It’s an unfussy, strong, versatile, heathered wool. Scout is a Dk weight, woolen-spun yarn, so it’s light, airy and springy – perfect for fair isle, cables, or any other technique that requires a bit of definition. Made with 100% Peruvian wool, it’s comfortable to work with and wear (it passes my yarn-o-meter, meaning it’s not as buttery soft as a merino wool, but it isn’t remotely in the itchy or uncomfortable range of fibres).

  • 100% wool
  • 100g/250m (274 yds)
  • 20 to 22 sts = 4″(10cm) 
  • DK to light worsted weight
  • 3.75mm/US5 to 4.5mm/US7 needles
  • Feltable
  • Hand wash, lay flat to dry
  • Made in Peru
  • Patterns designed with Scout

Sawyer

Sawyer is a great pattern for wearing and knitting. It’s simple, elegant and easy to wear. Sawyer is a great pattern for advanced beginners and intermediate knitters who want to expand their skills and build their confidence – Kelbourne has created little tutorials to help you through (see below).

Sawyer is worked flat in pieces from the bottom up. The lace pattern is provided in both charted and written form. After completing the front and back, stitches are joined at the shoulder using a 3 Needle Bind Off. Stitches are then picked up to work a deep ribbed turtleneck. After completing the shoulder and neck, stitches are picked up at the armholes and sleeves are worked flat in Stockinette stitch to the ribbed cuffs. Two options for sleeves are given in the pattern – pay attention to the schematic and choose the sleeve circumference that best suits your desired finished result. Once completed, the body and sleeves are seamed. Body length can be added easily by adding repeats of the lace pattern. The gauge is given in the lace pattern after blocking. Be sure to knit a blocked gauge swatch prior to beginning.

Size

  • Bust: 56.75” (144 cm) finished bust, one size.
  • Sleeves: 13 (17)” 33.5 (43) cm circumference at armhole.
  • The sleeves are designed to fit with 1–0” (2.5 cm–0 cm) of positive ease. Please see schematic for more detailed finished measurements.

Materials

  • Kelbourne Scout: 5(6) skeins
  • 3.5mm/US4 – 40” circular
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 24” circular
  • 4mm/US6 – 40” circular (2 pairs)
  • 4 mm/US6 DPNs.
  • 2 stitch markers
  • tapestry needle
  • Pattern

Skills

  • basic lace
  • picking up stitches
  • 3-Needle Bind-Off
  • mattress stitch

Tutorials

  • working from charts, visit our Charts Series here.
  • working the 3 Needle Bind Off, visit our tips and tricks here.
  • evenly picking up stitches, visit our tips and tricks here.
  • seaming using mattress stitch, visit our tips and tricks here.

Clawthorpe

Clawthorpe is a simple, pretty fair isle pullover, a great colourwork project for anyone. Clawthorpe is worked in the round from the bottom up. Both the body and sleeves begin with a provisional tubular cast-on, and the neck is finished with a tubular bind-off. After the body and sleeves are joined, raglan decreases are worked to shape the underarms, and short rows are worked to raise the back yoke. When working the yoke, you may find it helpful to change to the longer circular to accommodate the large number of stitches, and then change to the shorter circular when there are too few stitches to fit comfortably on the longer circumference.

Size

34.5 (38.5, 43.25, 47.25, 51.25, 56)” 87.75 (97.75, 110, 120, 130.25, 142.25) cm finished bust. Please see schematic for detailed measurements.

Materials

  • Kelbourne Scout: Main Colour 4(4, 5, 5, 5, 5), Contrast Colour: 1 skein in each of 4 colours
  • 3.5mm/US4 – 16″ circular
  • 3.5mm/US4 – 24″ circular
  • 3.5mm/US4 DPNs
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 24″ circular
  • 3.75mm/US5 – 40″ circular
  • 3.75mm/US5 DPNs
  • tapestry needle
  • 4 stitch markers
  • stitch holders or waste yarn
  • F hook
  • smooth waste yarn for provisional cast-on
  • cable needle (optional)
  • spare 16” circular for bind-off
  • Pattern

Skills

  • provisional tubular cast-on
  • colorwork in the round
  • short-row shaping
  • tubular bind-off

Tutorials

  • stranded colorwork from Charts, visit our Charts Series here.
  • kitchener stitch, visit our Tips + Tricks here.

Rippling Sands

Rippling Sands was inspired by the lines left behind in the sand at low-tide. The stunning twisted stitch pattern creates an overall wavy stitch pattern (achieved by using Bavarian twisted stitches). The design is a simple boxy, drop shoulder sweater worked in the round from the bottom up. The top portion is worked separately flat with the shoulders seamed together with a three-needle bind off. Afterward the 3/4 sleeves are picked up and worked outward from the body in stockinette stitch.

Size

  • Size 1 (2, 3) (4, 5, 6)
  • Bust: 37 (41, 45) (49, 53, 57)” or 94 (104, 114) (124.5, 134.5, 145) cm
  • Designed to fit with 4-8” /10-20 cm positive ease

Materials

Photo: Marie Greene

Soundtrack

Soundtrack is a cool pullover knit with two colours to create a mod graphic design. This sweater is great for anyone who likes mixing tradition & innovation.

Size

  • Finished Bust/Chest Circumference: 32 (36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, 64) in or 80 (90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160) cm

Materials

  • Kelbourne Scout: Main Colour 4(4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6) skeins, Contrast Colour 1(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2) skeins.
  • 3.75mm/US5 & 3.25mm/US3 needles (see pattern for details)
  • Stitch markers, tapestry needle, etc.
  • Pattern

Stoneham Poncho

About

Stoneham Poncho is worked in the round from the top down using traditional yoke shaping, in simple but bold geometric patterns. It’s a great fair-isle without all the work of sweatering. It’ll also be a very useful garment come the spring when life starts stretching its limbs and restaurant patios reopen.

Size

  • S/M (M/L)
  • collar circumference: 51(60) cm or 20.05(24)”
  • circumference at bottom: 125.5(152.5) cm or 50(61)”
  • length: 58.5cm or 23″
  • show in size S/M

Materials

  • Kelbourne Scout: Main Colour: 3 skeins, Contrast Colours: 1 skein in each of 2 colours.
  • 4mm/US6 – 16″ circular needles
  • 4mm/US6 – 32″ circular needles
  • 4mm/US6 – 40″ circular needles
  • 3.5mm/US4 – 16″ circular needles
  • 3.5mm/US4 – 40″ circular needles
  • 2 stitch markers
  • FREE Pattern

A-Line Tunic

I love the elegant lines of this tunic length sweater. The lines are simple, but so attractive – the kind of sweater that motivated me to learn how to knit.

Size

  • Small, Medium, Large, 1X, 2X and 3X
  • Shown in size Small.
  • Bust 34¼ (37¾, 41½, 45, 48¾, 52½)”/87 (96, 105.5, 114, 124, 132)cm
  • Length 28 (28½, 29, 29½, 30, 30½)”/71 (72.5, 73.5, 75, 76, 77.5)cm
  • Upper arm 11¾ (12½, 13½, 14½, 15, 15¾)”/30 (31.5, 34.5, 37, 38, 40)cm

Materials

  • Kelbourne Scout: Main Colour 5 (5, 6, 6, 7, 7)  skeins, Contrast Colours: 1 skein in each of 3 colours
  • 4.5mm/US7 – 24″ circular needles
  • 5mm/US8 – 24″ circular needles
  • 4.5mm/US7 DPNs
  • stitch markers
  • stitch holders
  • tapestry needle
  • Pattern

NEW Fibre Company Amble!

Fibre Company Amble

The Fibre Company Amble is a soft, beautiful, and eco-friendly sock yarn! It’s super soft, squishy, and gorgeous to work with and wear. The composition is a springy 2ply fingering weight full of body. While it’s perfect for socks, it also makes great hats, mitts, shawls & wraps, sweaters – anything you want to wear against your skin. Plus, what really made me extra happy is that it’s made with environmentally friendly manufacturing processes and uses recycled nylon to further reduce its environmental footprint (read more below). 

  • 70% Easy-wash Merino wool, 20% Easy-wash alpaca, 10% recycled nylon (see below for details)
  • 100g/325m (355 yds)
  • Fingering Weight
  • 32 sts per 10 cm / 4 in
  • 2.5 mm/1.5 US needles
  • Machine wash on wool cycle or hand wash at 30C / 86F. Dry flat.
  • Made in Peru

All about the Yarn

When The Fibre Co. set out to design a sock yarn, they stayed true to their guiding principle of harnessing the beauty that nature provides in a way that is gentle on our planet. They waited until a recycled nylon and an alternative to the standard chlorine processed washable wools became available. The end result is a soft yet durable yarn from Merino wool and alpaca fibres processed with an eco-friendly, anti-shrinkage Easy-wash treatment. The recycled nylon adds strength and durability. The shades are borrowed from the successful palette in their Cumbria yarn with the cream and all heathers using a natural ecru Suri alpaca whilst the others use a natural brown Suri alpaca.

What does ‘Easy-wash’ mean and why do they use it?
‘Easy-wash’ is a trademarked name that refers to a process used to make the wool and alpaca fibres in Amble machine washable without shrinking. The Easy-wash method is chlorine-free and AOX-free, making it the best environmental choice for producing machine-washable wool. The wool and alpaca fibres are treated with eco-friendly oxidants to remove the scales that ordinarily cause wool and alpaca to shrink when washed by machine. The oxidants used are sourced in Germany and are certified under the REACH, Oeko-tex and ZDCH (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemical) standards. This means that the Easy-wash treatment does not create hazardous chemicals, which is not the case with most machine washable wools in today’s market.

Much of the available machine washable wool yarn is made with a chlorine treatment process that produces high levels of toxic Adsorbable Organohalogens, known as AOX. While yarns produced in this manner are not known to be toxic to the user, AOX used in the treatment end up in wastewater and have a detrimental impact on tributaries, wildlife, and fauna.

What is recycled nylon and why do they use it?
Nylon fibre is not easily biodegradable. However, it has strength qualities that give yarns and the socks made there from more durability. The recycled nylon used in Amble comes from leftover industrial waste of processing nylon, thereby diverting waste from landfills, and using fewer production resources like water and fossil fuels than virgin nylon.

One Sock Pattern

To go along with Amble, The Fibre Company has also come out with a universally sized pattern called One Sock, a classic top-down sock pattern to fit all feet. With lots of opportunities to customise the fit and design, this pattern comes with the ‘One Sock Guidebook’, a resource that walks makers through the process of knitting beautiful socks that fit. You can find the pattern HERE.

The pattern is written by Kate Atherly, one of the best knitting teachers I’ve ever come across. In my opinion, this pattern is a great deal for someone who is new to sock knitting. I know the pattern is supposed to be the main attraction, but I think the guidebook alone is well worth the cost of admission!

Size

  • Finished Foot Circumference: 12.5 (14: 15: 16.5: 18: 19: 20.5: 21.5: 23: 24: 25.5) cm (5 (5.5: 6: 6.5: 7: 7.5: 8: 8.5: 9: 9.5: 10) in)
  • Leg Length: 12.5 (14: 15: 15: 16.5: 16.5: 16.5: 17: 18: 18: 18.5) cm (5 (5.5: 6: 6: 6.5: 6.5: 6.5: 6.75: 7: 7: 7.25) in) Adjustable to preference
  • Foot Length: Adjustable to fit.

Materials

  • The Fibre Company Amble: 1 skein
  • 2.25mm/US1 double pointed needles (or 9″/10″ circular needles)
  • 2.5mm/US1.5 double pointed (or 9″/10″ circular needles)
Photo: Tin Can Knits

Rye Light (freebie)

Rye Light is a great pattern that leverages a simple texture to make the most of a solid or semi-solid coloured yarn like Amble. It’s a great pattern for beginners, and it comes with it’s own instruction built into the pattern (the designers even wrote a How to Knit Socks Tutorial). It ranges from size Baby up to Adult Large, and best of all, it’s a free pattern.

Size

Baby (Toddler, Child, Adult S, M, L)

Finished measurements (unstretched):

  • Cuff: 5 (5.75, 6.5, 7.5, 8, 9)” around
  • Leg (adjustable): 2.5 (4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, 8)”
  • Foot (adjustable): 4 (6, 7.5, 9, 10, 11.25)”

Materials

  • The Fibre Company Amble: 1 (1, 1, 1, 2, 2) skeins
  • 2.25mm/US1 double pointed needles (or 9″/10″ circular needles)
  • 2.75mm/US2 double pointed (or 9″/10″ circular needles)
Photo: Jennifer Steinglass

Solvi

Amble also makes a great sweater yarn, especially for fair isle. The yarn has a lovely depth of colour, a heathered look which actually comes from the naturals colours of wool and alpaca blended together. It’s a springy two-ply yarn that soft to the touch (no itchies) and a pleasure to work with. I especially like the fair isle sweaters designed by Jennifer Steinglass, but it’ll be gorgeous in any suitable pattern, for adults and children alike.

Solvi starts at the neckline and is worked seamlessly from the top down, and in the round. Short rows shape the back and neckline of this sweater. The colourwork yoke is knit, then the body and sleeves are then separated- stitches for the sleeves are transferred to spare needles or waste yarn and underarm stitches are cast on. The body is worked on one circular needle and finished with a ribbed hem. Sleeve stitches are then transferred to knitting needles, the underarm stitches are picked up, and the sleeve is knit top to bottom, finishing with a long ribbed cuff.

Size

  • Finished bust: 36.25 (38.25, 40.75, 43.25, 45.5, 49.5, 52.25)(55, 57, 59, 61.5, 64.25, 67)” OR 91 (95.5, 102, 108, 113.5, 123.5, 131)(137.5, 142.5, 147.5, 153.5, 161, 167.5) cm.
  • Sizes listed are finished sweater measurements.
  • Choose the sweater size that is 4-6” / 10-15 cm larger than your actual bust circumference.
  • Shown with 6” / 15 cm ease.

Materials

  • Main Colour: Fibre Company Amble, 3 (4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5)(5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7) skeins
  • Contrast Colour: Fibre Company Amble, 1 skein
  • Needle A: US 4 / 3.5 mm DPNs (if desired) or 32” (80 cm) or longer circular needles for magic looping cuff, 16” (40 cm) or 32” (80 cm) or longer circular needles for magic looping (neckline), and 24” (60 cm) or longer circular for hem ribbing.
  • Needle B: US 5 / 3.75 mm DPNs (if desired) and 32” (80 cm) or longer circular needle for body and magic looping sleeves.
  • Pattern

SWEATERS in Fibre Co Acadia

Prologue

When I started researching Fibre Co. Acadia I found more project ideas than I ever expected, although it makes a lot of sense, it’s YUMMY! In this post I’m looking at sweater ideas so that people who need sweater quantities of the yarn can get them first (a post with smaller projects and accessories will follow in a couple of days). I’ve included a link for finished projects in the materials section for each project, so you can check out how people peoples look. Here’s a link for ALL the clothing ideas. I’m about to have a shipment of some other yarns shipped, so if you need more than we have in stock PLEASE contact us, I may be able to make some magic happen!

USE code ACADIA10 at checkout to receive 10% OFF your ONLINE purchase of Fibre Co. Acadia!

  • This offer is only available for a limited time and EXPIRES at 11:59pm October 26, 2020.
  • Make as many purchases as you like, there’s no limit on the number of times you use this discount code before it expires.
  • This offer does NOT apply to in-store purchases.
  • You can have your online order shipped or pick it up in store, you can chose at check-out.

Fibre Company Acadia

I originally ordered a bag of Fibre Co. Acadia to play with, and as soon and I handled the bag I knew I had to get it for you! It’s just so luscious, so gorgeous, it made me happy, and now that the stock has arrived in the store I adore gazing at those cubbies and putting it away. Swatching it was a joy, and I’ve been feeling a little envious of the clients who’ve already snapped some up (I’m currently working of a hat for my beau, it’s loved-ones need hats & scarves season).

Fibre Co. Acadia is a luscious, and slightly rustic looking blend of silk-noil, baby alpaca and fine merino wool. It’s Ideal for creating a handmade wardrobe that can be worn almost all year round, Acadia comes in a range of colours that sit well together to offer makers ample choice for projects.

Most of the shades in Acadia have a heathered appearance created from layers of beautiful raw fibres of natural brown baby alpaca, ecru merino tops and silk-noil, which is then kettle dyed creating subtle duotones. Shades such as Egret, Sand and Mountain Ash use other natural shades of alpaca including white, light fawn and grey.

  • 60% Merino wool, 20% baby alpaca, 20% silk
  • 50g/133m (145 yds)
  • DK weight
  • 21 to 23 sts = 10 cm/4″
  • 3.75/US5 to 4 mm/US6 needles
  • Gently hand wash colours separately in cool water.
  • We recommend alternating hanks as you work to give an overall blended appearance.
  • Made in Peru
Photos: Carrie Bostick Hoge

Lucinda

Lucinda is a great basic pullover made for comfort and ease. It’s means to be a roomy, casual that looks great on everyone. Lucinda is worked in one piece in the round from the bottom-up until the underarms, then the fronts and the back are worked separately, joining the shoulders with a three-needle-bind-off. There are instructions for two sleeve lengths (shown in the shorter sleeve). The sweater was designed with Fibre Co. Acadia, and it’s actually been knit up 76 times with it on Ravelry (there are lots of great looking Acadia Lucinda’s to be seen).

Skill Level

Lucinda should be good for anyone at the advanced-beginner to intermediate skill level.

Size

  • Finished Bust: 37¼ (40¼, 44, 47¾, 51¼, 54¼, 58, 61¾, 64¾, 68½)“
  • Shown in size 44” with shorter sleeves and 10” positive ease

Yarn

Fibre Co. Acadia:

  • For shorter sleeves: 8 (9, 9, 11, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16) skeins
  • For longer sleeves: 9 (10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17) skeins

Other Materials

Sheffield Cardigan

The Sheffield Cardigan is an easy-to-wear, fun-to-knit, fluid and elegant piece which was created specifically for the lusciously-tweedy Fibre Co. Acadia. Sheffield is an open cardigan with slightly-dolmaned sleeves that looks great in a variety of different fits. It’s worked from one sleeve cuff to another, in a single piece. The subtle Garter Stitch ornamentation highlights the lustre and drape of this nubby, tweedy yarn. The pattern is suitable for a beginning sweater knitter.

The sizing on Sheffield is very flexible. If you’d prefer a closer-to-the-body look, like Naomi in the tan sample, try a size that’s 2 – 4” (5 – 10 cm) larger than your upper torso circumference. If you like things extra-generous and kimono in feel, go for a size that’s at least 12” (30.5 cm) larger than your upper torso circumference, like Naomi in the grey. Or, anything in between.

Size

  • The sizing on Sheffield is very flexible. If you’d prefer a closer-to-the-body look, like Naomi in the tan sample, try a size that’s 2 – 4” (5 – 10 cm) larger than your upper torso circumference. If you like things extra-generous and kimono in feel, go for a size that’s at least 12” (30.5 cm) larger than your upper torso circumference, like Naomi in the grey. Or, anything in between.
  • Finished bust circumference: 34 (36½, 38, 40½, 42, 44½, 46, 48½, 50, 52½, 56, 60)’’ or 86.5 (92.5, 96.5, 103, 106.5, 113, 117, 123, 127, 133.5, 142, 152.5) cm

Materials

Photos: Jennifer Steingass, sarah-lee

Arboreal

I really like this sweater, I had eyeballed it for a first fair-isle sweater and when it popped up in my search I was super excited. It looks absolutely gorgeous made with Fibre Co. Acadia, it really took the idea of a fair-isle into a different place for me. I’ve always thought of them as sheepier/woolier kinds of things, and the sheen in the yarn appealed to my subconcious magpie. As I implied, I also feel like the pattern is a good place to try-out the fair-isle colourwork technique.

Skill Level

An Intermediate knitter should be good for this project. The technique is fair-isle, so if you’ve never done that before it’s a good idea to practice the technique on something smaller beforehand to establish your tension, like a hat or cowl.

Size

  • Bust circumference: 33.25 (36, 38.5, 42, 45)(47, 49, 51.5, 53.25, 56)” 84.5 (91.5, 98, 106.75, 114.5)(119.5, 124.5, 131, 135.25, 142.25) cm

Materials

Photos: Boylandknitworks, Esmith43

Ninilchik Swoncho

Wha is this garment? A “swoncho” is what happens when a poncho and a sweater have a baby. It’s a great cover-up, oversized, fairly shapeless, but it also has arms, so you can hold things and have greater mobility. The shape is also a great place to practice your fair-isle, it won’t matter if your tension isn’t spot-on, it’s raison d’etre is being oversized … and being pretty too, of course! The colours in Fibre Co. Acadia are all complementary, their tones are all complementary and go with each other, so none will clash (of course, if you can’t make it to the store and want help choosing colours please feel free to contact us for a colour consultation, it’s actually one of my favourite parts of my job).

Skill Level

An Intermediate knitter who’s on the advanced side of the spectrum should be good for this project. The technique is fair-isle, so if you’ve never done that before it’s a good idea to practice the technique on something smaller beforehand to establish your tension, like a hat or cowl.

Special Skills Required

  • Knitting in the round
  • short rows
  • stranded colourwork (note that while most rounds use only 2 colours, there are 2 rounds which require carrying 3 colours)

Sizes

  • Sizes: 1 (2)
  • Size 1 will fit XS-M, size 2 will fit L-3X
  • Body Circumference: 69 (83)” 175 (211) cm

Materials

USE code ACADIA10 at checkout to receive 10% OFF your ONLINE purchase of Fibre Co. Acadia!

IN PROGRESS Love Note (on my needles)

Love Note

I have fallen seriously behind in my COVID knitting … you know how it goes, make plans and universe laughs. I pulled some sexy yarn from my ‘stash’ and have been working on Love Note. I know fuzzy isn’t really spring but hey, my pandemic, my rules. My sweater is not the pink one, that belongs to the pattern designer, mine is the dark one in progress below.

I finished the body last night and tried it on and it looked amazing! I’m feeling motivated to finish the arms and wear it – it feels light as air, it should be great over a cami. The lace looks really pretty, I’m not really a lace person, but it isn’t too much, and it’s in the right place. There is a sort of high front/lower back thing going on, if you aren’t into it you can skip it, although I would put in at least half of the short rows to even out the front & back. The pattern has both a cropped and full length version, I’m making the adult size XS in the full length (see below for interesting things about size), I added a 1/2 inch, and it’s still on the short side style-wise. I highly advise trying on your sweater before starting the short rows. BTW, the lace is fairly simple, and the pattern comes with both a chart and the written instructions.

The pattern uses a thin mohair held with a fingering weight yarn, but I’m not really up for mohair (itchy), so I have subbed a ‘blown yarn’ with baby alpaca. Blown means it has a knitted core and the alpaca is literally blown into it with a machine. It makes an extremely light, airy yarn that has some depth to it. I’m using Illimani Amelie, but you can also use the very similar and quite affordable Drops Air (or if you want I’ll special order you some Amelie, it’s super yummy scrummy sexy (I don’t have any in store right now, it costs $24/skein).

Size

The pattern is EXTREMELY size inclusive, it runs from a baby 0-6 months up to an adult 5XL (72″ bust). I’m thinking matching mommy/baby sweaters? Sibling sweaters? Cousin sweaters? BFF sweaters? The opportunities are endless. The baby and child sizes are an ideal opportunity to use Drops Air – my mom always said you can put a baby in anything, that they can’t complain, but I beg to differ – they seem to be adept at wailing their adorable little heads off for as long as they feel uncomfortable.

  • 0-6 mo (6-12 mo, 1-2 yrs, 2-4 yrs, 4-6 yrs, 6-8 yrs, 8-10 yrs, Adult XS, S, M, L, XL-XXL, 3XL-4XL, 5XL)
  • Finished Chest Measurement: 24.5 (25.5, 26.5, 28.6, 30.5, 32.5, 34.5, 38.5, 41.5, 44.5, 48.5, 56.5, 66.5, 72.5”)

Materials

  • Drops Air (cropped version): 2 (2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 8, 9) skeins
  • Drops Air (regular version): 2 (2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) skeins
  • 6mm/US10 circular needles (length depends on the size you’re making, interchangeable needles are good for this project)
  • 4.5mm/US7 circular needles
  • 6mm/US10 double pointed needles (or alternative)
  • 4.5mm/US7 double pointed needles (or alternative)
  • scrap yarn
  • stitch markers (optional but useful in the lace)
  • Pattern

Connecting

Sorry we haven’t connected in a while, I’ve been working hard and am healthy and happy. You know how it is, this experience is wearing on the most resilient of us – going eyeball to eyeball with fear and vulnerability is challenging. Anyway, I haven’t been feeling myself lately, but I think that’s ok, I’m growing into something new, so I’m just sort of letting myself marinate. I saw my niece and nephew for the first time since before march break and found they have grown … they used to fight like cats & dogs and now they’re BFFs (it only took a month and a half of being locked in together). They got bigger too, but that’s a given.. they’re kids. Anyway, here’s what I’ve been up to (should you be interested):

Reading: The Power of Now by Ekhart Tolle (audiobook) … I just started this on Sunday and it’s the kind of book that you’re going to read over and over as you grow. I think it’s also the kind of book that you don’t read until you’re ready for it. I wouldn’t say the material is over my head, but I’ve got some work ahead of me.

Watching: Star Trek: The Next Generation (on Netflix) … most, but not all of it stands up. Picard is still great, but why isn’t Troi in a uniform?! I mean, is she a civilian? Is she starfleet?

Listening: Tara Brach podcast …. I’ve wandered from her excellent weekly pandemic support content and have crawled into the back-catalogue from B.C. (ie. before covid). The episodes on Radical Compassion from December 2019 are excellent, this morning I was listening to Desire and Addiction from March 2020.

Discussing: The Zombie Apocalypse … apparently I’m not on my beau’s Zombie Apocalypse ‘team’ and he’s throwing me under the bus. On the upside, he says the team will eat me. I don’t really blame him, I can’t run and I bruise easily. Anyway, I don’t really want to be around for the Zombie Apocalypse anyway, it sounds stressy and low on crafts. Other topics of interest include washing our winter coats … is there anything better than sucking the air out of the storage bag containing your winter coats? That’s a feeling worth savouring!

Cooking: Instant Pot Chicken Adobo. Yummy, simple and easy! Serve with Rice and a veggie. Freeze in batches for quick prep later.

Working On: Making vulnerability my BFF … according to researcher Brené Brown in Daring Greatly: “Vulnerability is the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity. It is the source of hope, empathy, accountability, and authenticity. If we want greater clarity in our purpose or deeper and more meaningful spiritual lives, vulnerability is the path.”

xox Haley

FINISHED Felix Cardigan

Felix Cardigan

After we finished the Felix Pullover I wanted to try the cardigan version of the sweater for myself, as a store sweater (as opposed to my home sweaters, or commuting sweaters – those are completely different categories of sweater). I was kind of dawdling, so it took me a while to complete, but it’s actually a very quick knit and I don’t think others would have a hard time getting through it. I also learned a few news things along the way! I love learning new things!!!

Fit & Style

So the style is a bit oversized and is supposed to fit with positive ease, and I’d describe the style as demure. I made the smallest size and it’s plenty roomy – after blocking it is 42″ in circumference in the bust (buttoned). The neckline is designed wide, and if you do a sewn/tubular bind-off it will be even wider (I’ll talk more the bind-off below) – which might be good if you have narrow shoulders like me. The fit feels cozy, comfy, and casual, and I don’t feel like you can see much body underneath, partly because of the design and the yarn I used (Cascade Eco+ Merino). There isn’t any shaping through the body, but if some A-line shaping suited you it would be very easy to include.

Things I like: 1. It makes my shoulders look bigger. 2. It looks good over a t-shirt, with skinny jeans . 3. It isn’t too warm. 4. It’s roomy for puffy days.

Things I don’t like: 1. It’s oversized so my shape gets lost (I always feel a bit lost in oversized garments).

The Yarn

After seeing clients make a few gorgeous Carbeths we made the Felix Pullover with Cascade Eco+ Merino, and since I wanted some new colours in my wardrobe this winter so I gave this pretty periwinkle blue/purple a go. Cascade Eco+ Merino is a soft, springy 100% South American merino wool, made in Bolivia. Its spongy, springy and has a ton of body and memory. I think it would hold texrure beautifully and make a dynamite cabled scarf or cowl.

The yarn was soft and easy to work with, and a nice quality at a good price. It wet blocked well, but it really looked fantastic after a good steaming. It’s a neutral feeling yarn, and I think it’s great for the price (by ‘neutral’ I mean it doesn’t feel like it was made from sacred sheep and spun in a mill run by Disney princesses, employing a unionized workforce of well paid small animals and home accents with a background in musical theatre). If you want an “OMG, did vestal virgins knit this sweater?!” experience treat yourself to some Malabrigo Mecha or Diamond Luxury Baby Alpaca Sport, you won’t regret it.

Yarn Alternatives

MALABRIGO MECHA: This hand dyed, incredibly soft singly ply merino wool would hands-down make the MOST Stunning cardigan EVER! 6(7, 7, 8, 9) skeins would make a cardigan you’ll never want to take off. I’d opt for one of the semi-solid colourways, otherwise you’ll lose the pretty lace detail in the shoulders.

DIAMOND LUXURY BABY ALPACA SPORT: For an extra soft and drapey version, try Diamond Luxury Baby Alpaca Sport: 6(7, 8, 9, 9) skeins. NOTE: alpaca is VERY stretchy and you can probably go down a size from what you would normally wear.

DROPS AIR: The pattern was originally written to be a looser knit on an aran weight yarn that blooms. If you want to try a lighter or airier version, try super soft Drops Air: 4(5, 6, 6, 7) balls. This would would make a sensational spring pullover which would look great over a tank top, or be a great sweater for warm climates and for people who run warm. This is also a super affordable option, running from $40 to $70 (depending on size).

BERROCO VINTAGE CHUNKY: For a machine washable sweater or something for someone who is extra itchy or allergic, I’d go with Berroco Vintage Chunky: 5(6, 7, 7, 8) skeins. Vintage Chunky is also a pocket-book friendly choice, running from $50 to $80 for the project (depending on size).

QUNICE & CO KESTREL: Do you winter down south or live in a warm climate? I don’t, but if I did I’d go for an aran/chunky weight, machine washable linen like Quince & Co Kestrel: 9(10, 12, 13, 14) skeins. NOTE: Linen is VERY stretchy and you can probably go down one or two sizes from what you would normally wear.

Size

Felix is supposed to fit a little bit oversized and casual. I made the first size, which is a small but fits oversized and loose.

  • S(M, L, XL, XL2)
  • Circumference at bust at underarm: 39 (43 ½, 48, 52 ½, 57)”
  • Length from right front cast on to right neck edge: 22 (24, 25, 27, 28)”

Materials

  • Cascade Eco+ Merino: 2(2, 2, 3, 3) skeins, colour 24
  • 5mm/US8-16″ and 24″ circular needles
  • 6mm/US10-16″ and 24″ circular needles
  • 5mm/US double pointed needles
  • 6mm/US10 double pointed needles
  • Stitch markers
  • Tapestry needle
  • Pattern: Felix Cardigan
  • My Ravelry Notes (for modifications for button-bands and neck ribbing)

Learnings

At the very start of this wall-o-text I mentioned that I learned things, so here are my learnings!

1. Sewn/Tubular Bind Off is STRETCHY

The pattern suggests using a tubular bind-off, but you can use any kind of bind off you like. I figured I would give the Tubular-Bind off a go to see how it worked out, what it’s benefits and deficits were. Just to make sure we are on the same page, I used THIS TUTORIAL for a Long Tail Tubular Bind-Off.

At first the sewn bind-off looked like it would pull-in a lot and I’d have problems maintaining the shape of the garment. I think if you did the bind-off too tight this could end up being a problem, but at a normal or loose tension it is definitely not a concern. I did not really understand how stretchy this bind off can be until I wet blocked the sweater, at which point it really went to town! The bind-off edge was most sensitive on the front button bands and the neck-line, the edge on the cuffs was the most resilient. To get them back into shape I gave them a good steam, but the neck-line might need reinforcing down the line.

Benefits of a Tubular Bind-Off: 1. It makes a nice edge. 2. It’s very stretchy.

Deficits of a Tubular Bind-Off: 1. It takes time and patience, since it’s basically grafting/Kitchener stitch. 2. It’s very stretchy.

Conclusions: Pick your poison. I would probably do it again for the sleeve cuffs and the bottom of the sweater, possibly for the button bands, but definitely not for the neck.

2. Steam is Good!

I bought a little hand-held garment steamer on Amazon and I really like it! The stitches all fell into place beautifully, the places where the fabric had stretched bounced back, and the fibre looks great. I am now pro-steamer garment blocking. (BTW, did you know that Amazon has a discount section called Warehouse Deals? I think it’s stuff people have returned, so mostly opened boxes and superficially blemished products.)

3. The Perfect Sweater

I’ve been mulling around ideas about my understanding of perfectionism, which seems to be something that comes into play when people are learning. I don’t know if I’ve nailed anything down yet, but I definitely see that I’ve been carrying around some perfectionist ideals, and they really hold me back and keep me from feeling satisfied. When I make a sweater for myself I usually have a subconscious fantasy desire, I want it to be perfect, which for me means it’s my favourite thing EVER. I made this sweater to explore a bit (and have a new sweater), and part of that exploration was how I feel about pursuing things that aren’t absolutely phantasmagorical. At no point was this sweater a “This is going to be my favourite sweater EVER” type of project, and that’s really forced me to put myself outside of the safe and familiar. Don’t get me wrong, its a good sweater, and a nice sweater, I’m wearing it right now and you’ll see me wearing it around the store on a regular basis, but it isn’t my fantasy sweater. But who knows, maybe I’ll come to love wearing it around the store, and it’ll be my favourite store sweater? Maybe I’ll make another? Or maybe it will help me to try something new, and then another thing that’s new, and then a whole bunch of new new things until “favourite” takes on a whole new meaning to me? Maybe this wasn’t so much a “Learning” as a “Growing”?

FINISHED Carbeth Pullover

Carbeth (Pullover)

If you’re looking for a quick sweater to whip up before the fall weather really hits, this is IT! The Carbeth Pullover uses chunky weight yarn, 6mm/US10 needles, so it goes fast! The design is simple, elegant, and makes for a very easy to wear sweater with a little bit of interest in the details. It’s easy to change the measurements (make the body longer, make the neck longer or shorter, etc). We used the same yarn, Cascade Eco+ Peruvian Tones, but in a more interesting colour, 08 Rum Raisin (in the skein it looks brownish, but knitted up it looks more like an oxblood/dark red). We tried out the black/grey colourway last December when I made a Carbeth Cardigan, but I think it’s time to get some colour back into our lives!

Yarns

We used Cascade Eco+ Peruvian Tones, which gave it a contemporary look for a great price (the project used less than two skeins, and came in under $70). I’ve also seen it made a few times with Cascade Eco+ Merino, which is a softer merino wool, has more body and definition and still comes in under $76. If you need something machine washable you can’t go wrong with Berroco Vintage Chunky.

Mods

The pattern is a cropped style and we added one inch to the length of the body. I think if I was to make one for myself I’d like the neck longer – I like it all oversized and cozy.

P.S.

Many thanks to our sample knitter Tessa, without who I could not keep up with the hard work of inspiration.

Materials

NEW Fibre Co One Sweater

Pattern

Fibre Co One Sweater is a classic. It’s a timeless, gender-inclusive (unisex) knit – it will NEVER go out of style. Take good care of this sweater and you’ll have it forever. It’s knitted in one piece from the top down with a raglan sleeve. It has a little bit of short row neck shaping to make the fit comfortable (I hate it when the back of a sweater rides up). The pattern is offered in a broad range of sizes, from age 1-2 through to a 56” chest circumference. It also includes the option of a shorter or longer length for the adult sizes, and they included the extra yardage (I love these people).

Skill Level

This is a great project for knitters who are new to sweaters, as well as those who have already been initiated.

If you are ….

  • New to sweaters: it’s a good first sweater, you’ll learn useful new skills and it’ll give you the confidence to jump into more advanced projects.
  • Have a little bit of experience with sweaters: this shouldn’t phase you, and it’ll reinforce the skills you already have.
  • Experienced at sweaters: it’s great for those who want to go on autopilot and make something simple and timeless. 

This is normally a paid pattern ($9 USD/$12.50CAD) but The Fibre Co is offering it for free through stores when you buy the yarn for the sweater (Fibre Co Cumbria). Just ask us in-store or when you check-out online. 

Yarn

Let’s talk about the YARN. Fibre Co Cumbria is a traditional style British yarn, and at first glance it doesn’t look substantially different from other classic-ish string from the UK? What makes it special? Good question … it involves a story. A little while ago I decided to start exploring a different way to buy yarn for the store. Instead of making sure a yarn ticks a bunch of boxes of client needs (which I do still take into account), I decided to base my initial decision of how the yarn feels to knit with – ie. how ENJOYABLE it is.

So I started swatching and rating my enjoyment level during the process of working with the yarns. It has been a VERY interesting process. There have been a lot of gorgeous yarns that I thought would be great while in the skein, but once I cast-on they felt Meh, or worse, Yucky. Life is both very short and very long, and if I’m laying down my money for a pricey yarn I don’t want to work with Meh or Yucky. I want something that SINGS, something that brings me JOY. Furthermore, I don’t want you to either. There’s already enough Meh and Yuck in our world, I don’t want to spread more, I want to share Joy. It’s time to bring-back joy. 

Anyway, I’m sure you’ve already read between the lines and figured out that The Fibre Co. Cumbria was one of the yarns that absolutely SANG. I think I even swatched it twice, on separate occasions several months apart, and still had the same happy reaction. It was beautiful to work with, and I enjoyed it so much that when I ordered it I bought an extra bag to make a sweater for ME (if you want my yarn I’ll share it, I know where to get more).

  • The Fibre Co. Cumbria 
  • 2 [2: 3: 3: 3: 4: 5: 5: 6: 6: 7: 7: 8] hanks.
  • For longer length – [-: -: -: -: -: 5: 5: 6: 7: 7: 8: 9] hanks.
  • Yardage given includes enough to knit an 8” x 8” tension swatch.

Other Materials

  • 3.75mm (US 5) 40 cm (16 in) circular needle
  • 4mm (US 6) 100 cm (40 in) circular needle (or size to obtain gauge)
  • stitch markers
  • scrap yarn or stitch holders
  • tapestry/darning needle

Size & Fit

  • Finished chest circumference: 22.5(25.5, 27.5, 28.75, 30.5, 32, 33.5, 38.5, 41.5, 46.5, 49.5, 52.75, 57.5)”
  • For full details See table HERE

PATTERN HERE

NEW Berroco Estiva

Berroco Estiva

Berroco Estiva is a bulky weight, 100% cotton ribbon yarn, so it’s super soft, easy to knit with, and works up FAST! Plus, it has scads of yardage, so you can make a smaller size of Deschain with two skeins, or a shawl/wrap with one. The ball-band calls for 6.5mm/US105 to 8mm/US11 needles, so there’s lots of flexibility to play around. The yarn is made in Italy (personally, I’m always pleased to see milling happening in Italy, they do it beautifully there), and it is MACHINE WASHABLE (a good thing for summer garments)!

  • 100% Cotton
  • 150g/306m (336yds)
  • Knitting Gauge: 3.5 to 4 sts = 1″ (2.5cm) on 6.5mm/US10.5 to 8mm/US11 needles. 14 to 16sts = 4″ (10cm)
  • Crochet Gauge: 3.75sc = 1″ (2.5cm) on 6.5mm/K hook. 15sc & 16 rows = 4″ (10cm) 
  • Made in Italy
  • Machine wash in cold on delicate, lay flat to dry.
  • See Berroco Estiva on Ravelry
  • Patterns Designed with Berroco Estiva
Photo: whiteon

Deschain (in Berroco Estiva)

When I ran across these projects on Ravelry I knew we had to make one! The pattern, Deschain, was designed a few years ago by Quince & Co for their organic linen yarn, Kestrel (which is also stunning and I love and we sell and makes me very happy). But the pattern looks equally awesome made with a new bulky weight cotton yarn, Berroco Estiva.

Note: you might need to work extra pattern repeats to get your sweater long enough. While you are working, hold it up to your body as you go (for a size small you might need to knit extra length to get good coverage).

Photo: Whiteon

SPECKLES Mineville Merino Nylon DK

Mineville merino nylon DK Speckle COMBO.png

Mineville Merino Nylon DK

We’ve received more stock of Mineville Merino Nylon DK in some super pretty speckled colours, perfect for a spring Fade!

Mineville Wool Project Merino Nylon DK (1124) is super soft, machine washable, easy to work with, easy to wear, and subs easily for other DK weight yarns. It comes in a generous 100g/200m skein, which is enough to make an adult hat or pair of mitts (you’ll need two for a scarf or Honey Cowl, and about 6 for a women’s size medium sweater – check your pattern for full yardage requirements). With the nylon fibre content, this yarn is also great for socks!

Mineville Wool Project is an “off-brand” brand from the sisters at Fleece Artist and Handmaiden. The prices are excellent because we purchase the yarn in one-time only lots. This means that once it’s gone, it’s GONE, so be sure to order enough for your project.

  • 80% Superwash Merino Wool, 20% Nylon
  • DK weight
  • 100g/200m
  • 4mm/US6 needles
  • 22 sts = 4″/10cm
  • Machine Washable
  • Made in Canada
  • Free Pattern Ideas

 

 

 

Comfort Fade Cardi

 

Fade Combo

KNIT HACK Sweater Lab Prep

 

 

Sweater Lab TONIGHT

Our inaugural Sweater Lab ( in collaboration with Your Fiber Intake) starts TONIGHT! Since it’s a bit of an experiment for us, we don’t know what the result will be, but I think everyone will have fun, so it should be a success. For those of you who have already made a sweater, you don’t really need any prep, but for the uninitiated, I’d like to offer a bit of guidance. For more info on Sweater Lab, follow this MAGIC LINK (or click on the picture or any of the other links).

So You’ve Never Made a Sweater Before ….

DON’T PANIC … You don’t need to be afraid. It’s just a garment, and the pattern tells you how to do it, step by step. When you don’t know what a term or abbreviation means you can look it up on the internet. If you are old skool, you can look it up in a book, like The Principles of Knitting by June Hemmons Hiatt, The Knitter’s Companion by Vicky Square, or The Ultimate Knitting Book by Vogue Knitting.

Choose a Pattern

You need a pattern. I suggest going for something basic, something vetted, and something worked in the round.

BASIC … seems obvious, and yet many people make their lives difficult by taking on something more involved. Why do they do this, they get caught up in the *idea* of the finished product; they want it to be perfect and ideal for their taste. Let go of that, it’s your first sweater, not your last. It doesn’t need to be ideal, it just needs to be a sweater. Moreover, I have found that people are less likely to complete their projects when they contain a lot of barriers. Newbies with simpler projects tend to learn faster, have more success with their project and ENJOY THE PROCESS.

VETTED … this means a pattern that is written by a professional designer and has already been made by many people. For the following example, I’ll use FLAX by Tin Can Knits.  You can find the latter on Ravelry; go to a pattern, and click on the PROJECTS tab at the top of the page. It will show you all the projects people have made with the pattern. If you go to the drop-down menu that ways FILTER THESE PROJECTS you can refine your search to ALL HELPFUL PROJECTS. The little life preserver at the top right of each project indicates the number of people who found this project helpful. Presently, it is not possible to sort the projects by ‘Most Helpful’, so you have to troll through the projects to find one that is useful.

IN THE ROUND … I primarily prefer sweaters worked in the round (top-down) for newbies because they usually have minimal finishing, especially seaming. For newbies, seaming tends to be a barrier to actually finishing a project, and a bad seaming job decreases satisfaction with the project. Now, I’m not saying *never* make a seamed sweater, quite the opposite, there’s nothing sexier than old-fashioned set-in sleeves. You do not need to be afraid of or avoid seaming, but on your first sweater making a project in one piece tends to end with more Joy and less frustration. This goes back to our first principle, go for Basic andENJOY THE PROCESS.

TENSION … choose a pattern that is worked with a yarn that is a worsted to chunky weight (between 20 to 14 stitches over 4 inches/10cm). Going thinner or thicker seems to make life difficult, and decreases the success of the project.

Suggested Patterns

The following are all basic garments, are written by professionals, have clear instructions, and are worked in the round, from the top-down.

 

Choose a Yarn

A few considerations on choosing the yarn for your first sweater …

TENSION … make sure your yarn matches the stitch tension in your pattern or is close (within one stitch over 4″/10cm).

DURABILITY … you may be ripping back your work a few times, DO choose a yarn that has some durability and won’t get mucky with a lot of handling. Single ply yarns do not tend to wear well, no matter the price-point, they end up looking mungy very quickly. Multi-ply yarns tend to fare better. Super scratchy wool yarns tend to be very durable, super soft yarns tend to start pilling WHILE you are knitting. My best advice is to find something in-between. By the way, durability is also beneficial once you’re finished and will add to the longevity of the garment.

FIBRE …DO choose a fibre you enjoy, but DO NOT choose a fibre that is hard to work with. A 100% wool like Cascade 220 Superwash or Cascade Eco are ideal; they work up easily, wear well, and are cost effective. Wool blends are also suitable, like Berroco Vintage or Berroco Vintage Chunky; both knit well, wear well, and are machine washable, and people are rarely allergic to it. If you need a cooler yarn, try a cotton/synthetic blend like Cascade Avalon.  Fibres that are unpredictable or hard to work with include alpaca (and other camelids), linen, pure cotton, mohair, viscose (and other cellulose plant-based fibres like bamboo), and 100% synthetic yarns.

COLOUR … choose whatever colour makes you happy (solid, heathered, tweed, variegated, self-striping), but don’t choose something that is very dark. Dark colours will make it hard to see what you are doing, and this could prove to be a very bad thing on a project where you don’t really know what to expect.

PRICE … this is a touchy subject, especially since I’m the one selling the yarn and you are the one who has to actually shell out your hard earned cash. You don’t need to lay out a ton of money for a good yarn, but when it comes to cheap yarns, you get what you pay for. Actually, you often get less than what you paid for. The retail garment industry has decreased our awareness of (and exposure to) good textiles, and as a consequence, many people aren’t familiar with quality textiles or their market prices. Quality textiles are more expensive than you expect, you’re might experience a little bit of sticker shock. From my perspective, I’ve found that people who use a decent yarn enjoy their project more, it is more successful, they actually finish it, they like and use the finished product, and they enjoy the process.

Suggested Yarns

 

I think that’s about all I can handle writing (and you can read) right now, but I promise to follow this post up with a very exciting discussion on SWATCHING! (No, seriously, it’s REALLY important. You need to swatch, and you need to swatch properly).