Category Archives: cascade

Yarnsperiments & A Hack

On our Last Date I promised to update you on my yarnsperiments, and I have lots to share! I originally played around with holding 2 strands of Drops Brushed Alpaca and Silk together, and since then I moved on to see how it acted when I held it with a heavier yarn. The concept is to hold a light, airy yarn like a brushed alpaca or mohair with a heavier, more conventional yarn. The heavier yarn stabilizes the fabric, giving it body, and density. The airy yarn gives it a soft, all-over halo (please note: the fabric can only be as soft as the fibre. A downy alpaca will continue to be soft, and itchy mohair will still be scratchy).

And so, I offer up my experiments …. I’ve used the same 2 yarns throughout: Cascade 220 Superwash Sport and Drops Brushed Alpaca and Silk. The Cascade is a sport-weight machine washable merino wool, it is super soft and comes in 50g/125m skeins (perfect for experimenting). The Drops Brushed Alpaca and Silk is a worsted weight brushed alpaca that looks kind of like mohair but feels like happiness. It comes in 25g/140m skeins. Both yarns are 100% natural fibres.

On the C Train

My first foray into this combo was On the C Train, a pattern that was designed to be made with 2 strands of yarn held together. It’s made in a K1P1 rib (which I like to call ‘stupid stitch’, which while tedious to knit, makes for an elastic fabric that fits well. I ran short on my base yarn, the Cascade, so the size is a bit on the small side (slouchy on a 21″ head) – all of my modifications are in Our Ravelry Notes. 

The finished fabric almost looks felted, I think because of the colours:

  • The yarns were a dead-on colour match, there’s just about no distinction between the two when they were knitted up. Of course, dye lots can shift colours around, but this combo on this day for this project were twins.
  • Both yarns are solid colours. They are not heathered, so there isn’t any differentiation in the colour, it’s flat.
  • The colour is dark and doesn’t reflect much light. (Yes, yarn can reflect light, and it affects how you perceive the colour. The darker the colour is, the less depth and the flatter it’ll look). The halo of the alpaca also prevents light from being reflected off the merino.

Anyway, it looks really cool! It doesn’t feel remotely felted, it’s soft, extremely comfortable, and has an all-over lightly fuzzy texture. This hat could look really cool in a black on black combo.

Materials

Chunkeanie

Chunkeanie is a pattern we’ve made before, and I’ve always really liked the aesthetic. When I’m knitting it I feel really meh about it, but once it’s done it just looks amazing! It especially looks good on, which is important, since it’s a hat, not a tea cozy. One caveat, I feel like the pattern runs small, their size medium fits my 21″ head. The texture is still soft, and very comfortable. I like this particular yarn combo knitted on the 5mm/US8 needles, it blooms nicely, although I think the brim could be knitted on 4.5mm/US7 needles.

This colour combo with the light greys looks amazeballs! The light grey of the Cascade merino is a bit more of a cool colour, and the alpaca is warmer. They ended up working well together, with the fuzzy alpaca becoming the dominant colour. This is an interesting phenomenon that I hadn’t actually noticed until now. I’m glad I photographed the hats next to their constituent yarns, you can kind of see which colour is more dominant when they are neighbours. Cool! I just learned something new!

The fabric of this hat looks a lot less flat and more fuzzy than felted, probably for a few reasons:

  • Both of the yarns’ colours are heathered, which give it a bit more depth of colour.
  • In the purple alpaca yarn the silk and alpaca content are almost indistinguishable, the entire strand looks the same. In the light grey the silk (the carrier yarn or core) took the dye in a different way (silk does this, it’s fickle) and it is lighter than the alpaca (you can see the silk shining through in the picture below). This little hit of colour runs through the stitches, randomly creating little highlights. (One of the advantages of knitting holding 2 strands together is that the colour distribution is completely random. When the yarns are already pre-spun together you lose that added depth of colour.)
  • The value (the lightness or darkness of a colour) of the colours is much lighter than the purple hat. The dark value of the purple hat added to the flatness of the colour. With this hat, the lightness of the colour creates a greater depth of colour. I can still see details in the yarn, like the stitches and the plies. Even though our mind doesn’t tend to register those little lines, they create micro shadows which in turn creates contrast and adds more depth to the overall colour.

Anyway, this hat-speriment was definitely a win. It looks really good on me, and I think I’m going to have to make myself a second – otherwise I’ll swipe the store sample.

Materials

Chunkeanie

The grey hat worked out so well that I decided to try a different colour and make one for my mom. My mother has a little mini head, so I opted to try a smaller needle size and went down to a 4mm/US6 for the ribbing and 4.5mm/US7 for the crown. The tension was fine, but I definitely feel like the 5mm/US8 was a prettier tension.

The first hat (purple) was a dark colour, the second (grey) was a light colour, and this one was in between. It looks like the fuzzy yarn (the alpaca) is still coming out as the dominant colour in the fabric. The alpaca also seems to look patchier in this hat, which is an optical illusion because it is exactly the same as the other two hats. This is because of the special things going on with this particular colour combo:

  • The Cascade merino is a heathered colour, so it isn’t as flat as the purple. But the heathering is only one colour, white, and it isn’t as complex or have the depth of colour that is in the light grey, which has black and white in it. (You’ll have to take my word on this, my camera skills haven’t made it this far.)
  • The Cascade merino is a bit lighter than the alpaca, while in the other combos this was reversed. The base is showing through a lot more than the other hats, which look more uniform. Light colours project and pop out to the eye, while dark colours recede.
  • Like with the grey hat, the silk hasn’t taken the dye exactly the same as the alpaca and is peeking through, creating some small highlights.

Materials

Knit Hack: Alternate Cable Cast-On

The Chunkeanie pattern calls for an Alternate Cable Cast On, which you do not have to do to make this hat, but I like trying new things, seeing how they work, why the designer chose to use it, etc. The Alternate Cable Cast On is a great way to cast on for a ribbed edge of K1P1 or K2P2 and is a much, much, much easier alternative to a Tubular Cast On. Like, SO MUCH.

So if it’s so much easier, why does it need a hack? Good question. When you do this cast on you’re basically alternating making a knit stitch, then a purl stitch, a simple enough concept – in theory. In theory, my brain should be able to pay attention to knits and purls and knits and purls. In THEORY. In reality, I found myself having a nice little rendez-vous with my learning disabilities. I was constantly screwing up the sequence of the knits and purls and having to rip it out.

How I Mastered this Cast On

Stitch Markers. Get them, use them, they’re your little plastic friends! I placed a stitch marker after every 10 stitches, and before proceeding more than a few stitches past that I went back and checked to make sure the last 10 stitches were correct. Once I confirmed that I was on track, I moved on to the next 10.

Read the Stitches. The other thing I had to do was learn to read what the knit and purl stitches looked like. You can’t check to see if your stitches are correct if you don’t know what they are. The best way is to just practice casting them on and looking closely to see how the knit looks compared to the purl. To my eye, the knit is a long bar that sticks out and the purl is bead or a bump that recedes. I tried taing a picture and labelling it for you, but I don’t know if it’s super helpful – people all conceptualize things in different ways, so it’s best just to study your stitches closely and get familiar with them in your own terms.

Pay Attention to Your Join. This is where reading your stitches again comes in handy. Because the sequence of the stitches is what this cast-on is all about, I joined my stitches by threading the yarn tail on a darning needle and pulling it through the other side. I don’t know why, but I found that once joined my stitches had gotten turned around to the other side, and my round was starting with a purl. At this point I didn’t really care why or how this was happening, I just wanted to get on with it and make a hat, so I adapted and started my ribbing on a purl.

Conclusion

OMG, that was SO. MANY. WORDS. I’m sorry if it’s too many words, too much explanation. Please feel free to take it or leave it, or take some and leave the rest. My conclusions are thus:

  • The hats look really good!
  • I like the yarn combination, it worked out well.
  • The grey hat made me the happiest, but the purple was cool.
  • I now know more than I did before, and this exploration was definitely a worthwhile use of time and resources.

I’ve already moved on to my next project, I’m knitting a Nuvem with the Drops Brushed Alpaca and Silk as a straight-up single stand. I think it’ll make for a super cosy wrap for spring, and so far it looks great – but more to follow!

PROJECT/CLASS Carbeth Cardigan

Carbeth Cardigan

Check out my new Carbeth Cardigan – I just finished blocking it, and it’s definitely a win. It was relatively quick, and I only used two skeins of Cascade Eco Peruvian Tones, so the price tag isn’t precious. I would totally make this sweater again, and in fact, I was so impressed with the design that we’re offering it as a class this February

Fit

The fit is great! I made the second size and it fits true to a size small (sometimes with sweaters with a lot of ease through the body it’s hard to tell which size will fit. I wasn’t sure the decorative detail in the shoulder would make me happy (diagonal lines in that area don’t always flatter petite shoulders) but I was very happy and surprised to find that they made my tiny shoulders look great! It’s hard to see on the mannequin because it has even less shoulder than I do, but the lines are very elegant. I think the sweater will look great with a high waisted pant like a trouser cut (unfortunately, another garment my mannequin doesn’t wear well). 

Happy Accidents

A small note about the colour of my yarn – it is not supposed to stripe or knit in blocks of colour. There seems to have been a problem with the dye lot I used, which was actually from last year’s stock. It looks like the dye was more saturated in part of the skein. After I figured out what was happening I decided to go with it – I wasn’t in the mood to rip it all back, so I figured I’d take a leap of faith, thinking it might look interesting or add something aesthetically. I think it did. 

Check Your Gauge

I swatched A LOT to make sure my tension was accurate. My tension may not be what yours is, so PLEASE swatch and measure your gauge before casting on!  The needles I used may not be the right size for you. The pattern called for 6.5mm/US10.5 needles, but I ended up going down to a 5.5mm/US9 to get the right tension. 

To measure your gauge, you want to knit a square approximately 6 inches x 6 inches in the stitch that the pattern suggests (if they say their tension is in stocking stitch, then do that). Wash your swatch in cold water with a delicate wash like Eucalan or Soak, and lay it flat to dry. Then, on a hard surface with a ruler, measure the number of stitches and rows inside 4 inches/10 cm in the centre of the piece. DO NOT cast on the number of stitches that are stated in the pattern gauge, this will make a swatch that is too small to measure your tension accurately. How many stitches should you cast on for a swatch? Take the number of stitches in the pattern’s recommended tension (ex. 14 sts = 4″/10cm) and multiply it by 1.5 … so if the tension is 14 stitches you should cast on about 21 stitches.  Also, always swatch with the same needles you are going to knit with – people’s tension can change with their comfort level with different types of needles. 

Materials

Yarn Alternatives

For a more luxe cardie try Diamond Luxury Collection Baby Alpaca Sport and 7mm/US10.75 (& 6mm/US10) needles (alpaca tends to be very stretchy, so consider going down a size in the pattern). If you need a yarn that’s machine washable, try Berroco Vintage Chunky and 6mm/US10 (& 5mm/US8) needles.

PROJECT Mega Rib Hat

Mega Rib

I’m so sorry you haven’t heard from me a few days, you guys have been keeping me very busy in the store! I did manage to get a quickie off the needles this week – check out my Mega Rib! I managed to knit up this beanie in a single night – does that make it a one night stand? It;s definitely last-minute-giftable! It was quick & easy, I used one skein of Fleece Artist Merino Stream and 8mm/US11 needles. This yarn was a bit thinner than the one specified in the pattern, but I think it still works. The hat would also look good made according to the pattern’s directions with Cascade Spuntaneous (a super soft, single ply merino wool). Oh, and I forgot, the pattern is a freebie!

Modifications

  • I used 8mm/US11 needles and the tension was comfortable a bit loose for a Canadian winter. Use 7mm/US10.75 needles for a denser tension.
  • I cast on 48 stitches, it fits an Adult medium. For an adult large cast on 51 sts, for a small cast on 45 sts.

Materials

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Mini Hack

When you cast on with a different number of stitches, a different stitch pattern or a different size needle this changes the tension and the colours may pool differently. 

PROJECT Modern Mocs

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Modern Mocs

I stumbled across these cool slippers and thought they’d make AMAZING holiday gifts! There are lots of yarn options, and they just look gorgeous. Cascade Eco has amazing yardage, and 1 skein makes a pair of slippers with lots left over. Berroco Vintage Chunky is soft, affordable and easy to both wear and care for (it’s totlly machine washable and is a blend of wool and synthetic, so it’s sturdier than a 100% wool yarn). Fleece Artist Back Country is a super soft, hand-dyed merino wool that would knit up some unforgettably super funky slippers.

One note: this pattern is for intermediate to experienced knitters. Techniques include German Short Rows (full instructions included in pattern), working in the round (magic loop technique is suggested), picking up stitches, crochet chained border (full instructions included in pattern). It also uses a double knit stitch for the sole, which is not hard but a neat new thing to try out (note, this stitch is NOT the same as the technique of “double knitting”, nor does it have anything to do with the yarn thickness of “Double Knit”).

Oh, and if these slippers aren’t your thing but you’re interested in slippers, the same designer, Bekah Knits, has some other really pretty slipper designs that are worth checking out.

  Size

  • S (M, L, XL, XXL) to fit US shoe size:  W’s 5-6 (W’s 7-8, W’s 9-10, W’s 11/M’s 9-10.5, M’s 11-12.5)
  • Fits Foot Length: 8.75” (9.5”, 10”, 10.75”, 11.5”) / 22 (24, 25, 27, 29) cm

Modern_Mocs_2__Large__medium2

Yarn Options

  • Cascade Eco: 1 skein per colour (or 1 skein if you make them a solid colour)
  • Berroco Vintage Chunky: Colour no. 1 (uppers/cream): 2 skeins, Colour no. 2 (bottoms/oatmeal: 1 skein. To make similar slippers, I would use colours 6101 and 6105 in this yarn.
  • Fleece Artist Back Country: 2(3, 3, 3, 3, 3) skeins for a pair of slippers in a single colour, otherwise Colour no. 1 (uppers): 2 skeins, Colour no. 2 (bottoms): 1 skein.

Other Materials

  • Pattern
  • 4mm/US6 straight needles (optional)
  • 4mm/US6 – 47″ (or 40″) circular  needles (for magic loop)
  • 4mm/US6 double pointed needles (2)
  • Crochet hook (size H)
  • Stitch markers
  • stitch holders
  • tapestry needle
  • fabric paint for soles (optional)

modern mocs combo

PROJECT Nightshift


Photos: Andrea Mowry

Nightshift

Andrea Mowry came out this super pretty new shawl pattern recently and I thought it would be totally gorgeous made with Cascade’s new marled-ombre yarn, Cascade 220 Superwash Wave!  It’s knit on 5mm needles, so it won’t take forever to finish this project, and it will be nice and cozy for the cold winter. The pattern calls for 6 colours but 5 of the Cascade is plenty to make your wrap, and you won’t suffer for lack of colour (the pattern is easy to change up, the designer wrote this into the instructions). I took a picture of a couple of colour combos I thought would look pretty (see below). Plus, Cascade 220 Superwash Wave is very reasonably priced your the project won’t break the bank.

Shop Online Button Turquoise 250w

NIghtshift Cascade 220 Wave Cool Colours 1

NIghtshift Cascade 220 Wave Warm Colours 1

 

Nightshift Combo 2

CLEARANCE Cascade 220 Superwash Sport Paints

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FINAL CLEARANCE Cascade 220 Superwash Sport Paints

Cascade 220 Superwash Sport is a super soft, machine washable merino wool. Like the name says, it’s a sport weight and works up on 3.75mm/US5 to 4mm/US6 needles. It;s perfect for babies, kids, men, or anything else you can think of. It’s also available in solid and heathered colours (not on sale). Just one skein is enough for a baby hat Like our Rialto Baby Beanie), 2 for an adult hat, mitts or neckwarmer, 2 to 3 for a baby sweater, 4 for a scarf or infinity scarf, 8 for a baby blanket.

NOTE: This yarn is on FINAL CLEARANCE, so get it now because once it’s gone it won’t be coming back!

  • 100% Merino Wool
  • 50g/125m (136yds)
  • Sport Weight
  • 3.75mm/US5 to 4mm/US6 needles
  • 22 to 24 sts = 4″ (10cm)
  • Machine wash cool, tumble dry low.
  • Made in Peru
  • Project ideas from Ravelry

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PROJECT Ley Lines

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Ley Lines

I’m so happy I stumbled across Ley Lines! I saw this wrap being knitted by a client a while ago, and even in progress, I LOVED the modernity and simplicity of the look. There’s just something about ribbing going in different directions that makes me thankful that I’m a knitter (cables do this to me occasionally too).  To make the most of the ribbing, use a semi-solid or solid coloured yarn, like Madeline Tosh Tosh Merino Light (a single ply merino),  Manos del Uruguay Alegria (a hand-dyed semi-solid), or if you prefer the crisp look of a mechanically dyed yarn, try Cascade Heritage (also easier on the budget).

Size

One size. Finished measurements: 90” (225 cm) from side to side and 34” (85 cm) from top to bottom at deepest point.

ley lines cream

Photos: Ivory Eve

Yarn Options

All the yarns below are ON SALE TO SEPT 6! The number of skeins you’ll need depends on the size desired, but you can definitely eke out a sizeable Ley Lines with two skeins (see IvoryEve’s, it’s beautiful).

Other Materials

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